NAME

    jacksum - a free, open source, cross-platform, feature-rich, multi-threaded
              data integrity verification tool.

VERSION

    3.3.0

SYNOPSIS

    jacksum [option]... [file|directory]...

DESCRIPTION

    Overview:

        Jacksum (JAva ChecKSUM) is a free, open source, cross-platform,
        feature-rich, multi-threaded data integrity verification tool.

        Data integrity ensures that data items have not been changed, destroyed,
        or lost in an unauthorized or accidental manner since they were created,
        transmitted, or stored.

        Hash values are used to implement data integrity.

        As a data integrity software Jacksum can generate, store, and compare
        hash values to detect changes made to files. Actually it can detect
        matching, non-matching, missing, and new files.

        Jacksum also allows you to identify files by their digital fingerprints,
        find files that match a given hash value, find all duplicates of a file,
        and even find the algorithm to a checksum/CRC/hash by calling a smart
        brute force algorithm.

        Since Jacksum supports a lot of features, features are explained briefly
        in the following sections:

            - Algorithm support
            - Processing
            - Input
            - Output
            - Performance
            - System requirements

        Type `jacksum -h examples` and go to https://jacksum.net to learn more
        about Jacksum.


    Algorithm support:

        471 standard algorithms are supported, including checksums, cyclic
        redundancy checks (CRCs), eXtendable Output Functions (XOFs),
        cryptographic, and non-cryptographic hash functions. All those methods
        map data of arbitrary size to fixed-size values. Those values are often
        called hashes, hash values, message digests, file fingerprints, or file
        thumbprints.

        Jacksum supports the "Rocksoft (tm) Model CRC Algorithm" to customize
        CRCs. That feature allows you to construct any of the possible CRC
        combinations with a [8..64] bit length. Jacksum also extends that
        well known model to include the length of the message optionally to
        the CRC. To learn more about that subject type `jacksum -h crc:`

        Jacksum supports calculating multiple algorithms simultaneously. Simply
        use a + sign in order to concatenate several algorithms together, e. g.
        tth+ed2k+sha1+md5. You can select all supported algorithms at once
        (-a all), use a filter by specifying a string (-a all:<string>) or a bit
        length of the message digest (-a all:<length>) in order to concatenate
        all algorithms that matches the filter criteria.
        To learn more about that subject type `jacksum -h -a`

        Note that not all algorithms are suitable to perform highly reliable
        integrity checks today. Actually it is recommended to use non-broken,
        cryptographic hash functions, because those algorithms are simply
        designed for that purpose.

        Note that even if the name of a cryptographic hash function sounds
        strong, it does not necessarily mean that the algorithm is still strong.
        Also algorithms that started as strong cryptographic hash function could
        loose that status if security analysts find weaknesses.
        MD5 for example is still used in many apps, but it is cryptographically
        broken since 2004 and it is deprecated. NIST formally deprecated use of
        SHA-1 in 2011. The advice is to avoid the use of single weak algorithms.

        The German Federal Office for Information Security (Bundesamt fuer
        Sicherheit in der Informationstechnik, BSI) recommends the following
        hash functions: SHA-256, SHA-512/256, SHA-384, SHA-512, SHA3-256,
        SHA3-384, and SHA3-512. See also BSI TR-02102-1, version 2022-01 as of
        January 28, 2022 (https://bit.ly/3pP3OXE)

        Nonetheless Jacksum will continue to support legacy algorithms as well,
        because in real life they are still in use and they are also useful for
        finding an algorithm by brute force if only the data and the hash value
        are known, and last but not least it is great for educational purposes.

        Supported standard algorithms:

        - International and national standards of cryptographic hash functions:
            - United States of America (USA)
                - SHA3-[224,256,384,512], and SHAKE[128,256] (NIST FIPS 202)
                - SHA-[224,256,384,512], SHA-512/[224,256] (NIST FIPS 180-4)
                - SHA-1 (USA) [broken]
            - People's Republic of China (PRC)
                - SM3 (GM/T 0004-2012, and ISO/IEC 10118-3:2018)
            - Russian Federation
                - Streebog-[256,512] (GOST R 34.11-2012) [weak]
                - GOST, and GOST Crypto-Pro (GOST R 34.11-94) [broken]
            - Republic of Korea (ROK)
                - LSH-256-[224,256], LSH-512-[224,256,384,512] (KS X 3262)
                - HAS-160 (KISA)
            - Ukraine
                - Kupyna[256,384,512] (DSTU 7564:2014)

        - Modern eXtendable Output Functions (XOF) as cryptographic hash
          functions with a fixed length:
            - KangarooTwelve
            - MarsupilamiFourteen
            - SHAKE256
            - SHAKE128

        - International accepted, modern strong cryptographic hash functions:
            - BLAKE3
            - BLAKE2s-[8..256], BLAKE2b-[8..512]
            - ed2k
            - HAVAL-[160,192,224,256]-[3,4,5]
            - RadioGatun[32,64]
            - RIPEMD[160,256,320]
            - Tiger2
            - Whirlpool

        - all 5 candidates from round 3 the NIST SHA-3 competition (2007-2012):
            - BLAKE-[224,256,348,512]
            - Groestl-[224,256,384,512]
            - JH[224,256,284,512]
            - Keccak[224,256,384,512]
            - Skein-256-[8..256], Skein-512-[8..512], Skein-1024-[8..1024]

        - 3 candidates from round 2 of the NIST SHA-3 competition (2007-2012):
            - ECHO-[224,256,348,512]
            - Fugue-[224,256,348,512]
            - Luffa-[224,256,348,512]

        - Proposals from the 2005 NIST workshops before the SHA-3 competition:
            - DHA-256
            - FORK-256
            - VSH-1024

        - Weak or broken cryptographic hash functions for education and
          backwards compatibility purposes:
            - HAVAL-128-[3,4,5]
            - MD2
            - MD4
            - MD5
            - MDC2
            - PANAMA
            - RIPEMD-128
            - SHA-0
            - SHA-1
            - Tiger
            - Tiger/128
            - Tiger/160
            - Whirpool-0
            - Whirlpool-T

        - Checksums that can be found in software products and operating
          systems:
            - Adler-32
            - cksum (Minix), cksum (Unix)
            - ELF (Unix)
            - Fletcher's Checksum
            - FNV-0_[32,64,128,256,512,1024]
            - FNV-1_[32,64,128,256,512,1024]
            - FNV-1a_[32,64,128,256,512,1024]
            - joaat
            - sum (BSD Unix), sum (Minix), sum (System V Unix)
            - sum [8,16,24,32,40,48,56]
            - xor8
            - XXH32

        - CRCs that are being used in many software products and protocols:
            - CRC-8 (FLAC)
            - CRC-16 (LHA/ARC), CRC-16 (Minix), FCS-16
            - CRC-24 (OpenPGP)
            - CRC-32 (FCS-32), CRC-32 (MPEG-2), CRC-32 (bzip2), CRC-32 (FDDI),
              CRC-32c, CRC-32 (UBICRC32), CRC-32 (PHP's crc32)
            - CRC-64 (ISO 3309), CRC-64 (ECMA-182), CRC-64 (prog lang GO,
              const ISO), CRC-64 (.xz and prog lang GO, const ECMA)


    Processing:

        Jacksum selects the appropriate operating mode dependent on the options
        and parameters that you set. Any operation can be cancelled at any time
        by hitting Ctrl+C in the terminal.

        Jacksum traverses directory trees recursively by default. You can
        control the walking depth by option -r. You can also set the options -f
        and -d in order to disallow Jacksum to follow symlinks to files and/or
        directories.

        Jacksum supports many charsets for reading and writing files properly,
        and it comes with full support for all common Unicode aware charsets
        such as UTF-8, UTF-16, UTF-16BE, UTF-16LE, UTF-32, UTF-32LE, UTF-32BE,
        and GB18030. A Byte-Order Mark (BOM) is supported for both input and
        output, even if a BOM is optional for the selected charset.


    Input:

        Input data can come from almost any source: files, disks, partitions,
        standard input stream (stdin), and/or provided directly by command line
        arguments. Also platform specific input such as NTFS Alternate Data
        Streams (ADS) on Microsoft Windows, and block devices, character
        devices, named pipes (FIFOs), and sockets (Unix-like OS only), and doors
        (Solaris only) are supported and can be hashed.

        Pointers to the input data can be given by command line arguments, by
        walking file trees recursively with a specific depth (-r), by file lists
        (-L), or by check lists (-c). In the case of lists, many different
        charsets can be selected in order to read localized, non-ASCII filenames
        properly (see also options --charset-check-file, --charset-file-list).
        You can specify the format of file-lists by setting --file-list-format.
        You can specify the format of a check-file by selecting a predefined
        parser or by defining your own parser (see also option --compat) so you
        can process input even if it was not produced by Jacksum.

        All platforms:
            On all supported platforms (Microsoft Windows, GNU/Linux, and Unix)
            Jacksum allows you to generate, store, and compare hashes from

                - files
                - standard input stream (stdin)
                - command line arguments (see also -q)

        Unix, and GNU/Linux:
            On Unix, and GNU/Linux there are additional file types available
            and Jacksum allows you to generate, store, and compare hashes from

                - block devices (i. e. disks and partitions, e. g. /dev/sda,
                  /dev/sdb, /dev/sr0, etc. and /dev/sda1, /dev/sda2, etc. on
                  GNU/Linux; /dev/disk0, /dev/disk1, etc. and /dev/disk0s1, etc.
                  on macOS)
                - character devices (e. g. /dev/null)
                - named pipes (FIFOs)
                - sockets
                - doors (Solaris only)

            Use the option --scan-all-unix-file-types to scan the Unix specific
            file types during recursively directory traversal.

            Notes:

                - Reading entire disks or partitions may require sudo resp.
                  root privileges!
                - Reading copyright protected DVDs may lead to I/O errors.
                - The OS may permit or prohibit reading (and hashing) of
                  particular disks or partitions if those are in use (mounted).
                - You should unmount block devices first before reading from
                  them, because if you don't unmount those, the device driver of
                  the block device may flag the disk as defect, and even that
                  single bit may lead to an entirely different hash value.
                - To unmount disks use "umount" on GNU/Linux and
                  "diskutil umount" on macOS.
                - To find disk identifiers enter "lsblk" on GNU/Linux and
                  "diskutil list" on macOS.

        Microsoft Windows:
            On Microsoft Windows there are additional file types available and
            Jacksum allows you to generate, store, and compare hashes from

                - disks, CD-ROMs, DVDs, etc. (e. g. \\.\PhysicalDrive0)
                - partitions (e. g. \\.\c:)
                - invisible partitions which are not mounted by default,
                  e.g. the recovery partition or EFI partition
                  (e. g. \\?\Volume{4a343c6b-3576-5e5e-2072-303c6b352131}\)
                - RAM disks
                - NTFS Alternate Data Streams on files
                  (e. g. my-file.txt:secret:$DATA)
                - NTFS Alternate Data Streams on directories
                  (e. g. .\:secret:$DATA)
                - the null-device (called nul on Microsoft Windows).

            Use the option --scan-ntfs-ads to scan for any NTFS Alternate
            Data Streams (ADS) during recursively directory traversal.

            Notes:
                - Reading data from raw disks and partitions usually require
                  administrator privileges!
                - Reading copyright protected DVDs may lead to I/O errors!
                - To find PhysicalDrive IDs on Microsoft Windows, enter
                  the PowerShell command Get-PhysicalDisk. To find partition
                  drive letters and access paths, enter the PowerShell commands
                  Get-Volume and Get-Partition or use the "mountvol" command on
                  the Windows Command Prompt.
                - Microsoft could change the syntax of the access paths without
                  any notice or even prohibit to access particular raw disks
                  and/or partitions in update releases or in new versions of
                  Microsoft Windows.


    Output:

        Output can occur in default format, predefined standard formats or in a
        user-defined format which is highly customizable.

        Default output:
            By default the output format is standardized and behaves like well
            known checksum resp. cryptographic hash tools on GNU/Linux such as
            sha1sum, md5sum, b2sum, digest, etc. However, the format also
            supports multiple algorithms, file size, and time stamps.

        Predefined output:
            The output format can also be made compatible to the output that
            other famous tools produce. BSD-, GNU/Linux-, Solaris, and openssl
            styles are supported. Also legacy formats such as SFV and FCIV are
            supported. See also the option --compat. In all cases, the
            predefined formats can be used for any algorithm that Jacksum
            supports, even if an original format was designed for one particular
            algorithm only.

        Customized output:
            The output can be completely customized (see option -F).

            To represent hash values, one of 16 encodings can be selected:
            binary, decimal, octal, hex (lower- and uppercase), Base16, Base32
            (with and without padding), Base32hex (with and without padding),
            Base64 (with and without padding), Base64url (with and without
            padding),  BubbleBabble, and z-base-32 (see also option -E).
            In case of hex, bytes can also be grouped and separated for easier
            readability (see also options -g, and -G).

            Also many different charsets are supported in order to write
            localized filenames properly (see also options --charset-stdout
            --charset-stderr, and --charset-output-file, --charset-error-file).
            Paths can be customized as well (see also options -P, --no-path,
            --path-relative-to, and --path-absolute).

            Timestamps can be customized by using the option -t. Predefined
            formats for timestamps such as ISO8601 or Unixtime are available.


    Performance:

        Jacksum supports multi-threading on multi-processor and multi-core
        computer systems. Jacksum can compute multiple hashes simultaneously,
        and it can process multiple files simultaneously.

        Many algorithms:
            If more than one algorithm is chosen for the calculation or
            verification process, Jacksum distributes that load across multiple
            cores. In that case the slowest algorithm selected determines the
            minimum computation time. Any file is read only once in any case.

        Many files:
            Jacksum uses the computing power of multi-core processors if
            available. This allows simultaneous/parallel calculation or
            verification of hashes for many files that are stored on
            direct access medias such as modern SSD.

        Alternative implementations:
            Jacksum comes with pure Java implementations for all supported
            algorithms. By default Jacksum checks whether an algorithm is
            provided by the JRE/JDK and if it is, it uses the implementation
            from the JRE/JDK, because often that gives the best performance.
            Because exceptions confirm the rule, this behaviour can also be
            disabled by setting the -A option.


    System requirements:

            Jacksum is written entirely in Java. Therefore it runs cross
            platform, without the need of recompilation. A Java Runtime
            Environment (JRE) or Java Development Kit (JDK) at least version 11
            is required. The latest available compatible OpenJDK LTS release is
            recommended.

            To take advantage of the performance of parallel processing, one or
            more multi-core processors are required.

PARAMETERS

    The following parameters are supported:

    files and directories
            Names of files and directories. You can specify as many files and
            directories as you like. Wildcards are supported, but they depend
            on the shell that you are using. With no parameters Jacksum reads
            from the standard input in the hash calculation mode.
            Starting with Jacksum 3.0.0 the recursive mode is enabled by default
            for directories, and you can control the depth with the -r option.
            Bytes are read from the standard input in binary mode.

OPTIONS

    The following options are supported:

    -a <algo>[+<algo>]... | all[:<length|string>] | crc:<crc> | unknown:<length>
    --algorithm <algo>[+<algo>]... | all[:<length|string>] | crc:<crc> | unknown:<length>
            Specifies the algorithm. Many algorithms support aliases in order
            to memorize their id more easily. Since Jacksum 1.0.0, see also -A.
            Starting with Jacksum 3, the default is sha3-256.

            One algorithm (-a <algorithm>)
                Replace <algorithm> with one of the IDs that Jacksum
                understands. To see all supported algorithm IDs and their
                descriptions type `jacksum -a all -l`
                Note: the option -a crc:<crc> allows you to define a customized
                CRC by using a parameterized model. Those customized IDs aren't
                listed by the command above, but you can select and use them.
                Learn more on this topic by typing `jacksum --help crc:`

            Several algorithms, handpicked (-a <algo>+...):
                Multiple algorithms can be selected by concatenating the
                algorithms by the plus character.
                Examples: "sha1+crc32", "sha512+sha3-512+blake2b-512", etc.
                The new algorithm resulting from all concatenated algorithms
                returns by default only one composite value consisting of all
                chained hash values. This feature allows you to use any
                combination of algorithms for any predefined standard style,
                even if the style was designed to support only one algorithm.
                Each file is read only once even if you select multiple
                algorithms in order to minimize I/O calls which improves the
                performance. Also each algorithm can run in parallel if you use
                a computer which supports multi threading.
                You can control the performance behaviour by setting the option
                called --threads-hashing.

                If at least one plus character is found in <algorithms>, the
                output is normalized by a hex lowercase checksum and a decimal
                file size is inserted.
                Example: "md5+", "sha256+", "sha3-256+"
                You can disable adding the filesize by setting --filesize off.

                You can customize the output behaviour by using the options -E,
                -F, -g, -G. Especially have a look at the various tokens for
                --format which allows you to highly customize the output to
                meet your actual needs.
                Available since Jacksum 1.7.0

            Several algorithms, filtered by bit length (-a all:<length>)
                In order to use all algorithms that have a particular bit-length
                you can use "-a all:<length>" where <length> has to be a
                multiple of 8.
                Examples: "all:224", "all:256", "all:888", "all:1024"
                Available since Jacksum 3.0.0

            Several algorithms, filtered by a string (-a all:<string>)
                In order to use all algorithms that matches a particular string,
                you can use "-a all:<string>" where <string> can be any string.
                Algorithm IDs and Algorithm alias IDs are being searched.
                Examples: "all:skein", "all:sha3-", "all:fnv", "all:whirlpool"
                Available since Jacksum 3.0.0

            All algorithms (-a all):
                If you set <algorithm> to "all", all supported algorithms are
                used which means that you can calculate hashes with hundreds
                of algorithms by reading the input only once.
                If "all" is used, the output is normalized by a hex checksum
                and a decimal file size.

            Find an unknown algorithm (-a unknown:<length>):
                If you only know both the input and the output, and if you want
                to know the algorithm that has been used to produce the output,
                you can set <algorithm> to unknown:<length>. Replace
                <length> with the length of the digest in bits. In that case,
                all supported algorithms will be tested whether there is one
                which can produce the expected output. Also a list of well known
                CRCs will be checked, and finally all CRC-algorithms will be
                tested by brute force (init and xorOut are set to either
                all bits zero or all bits one while refIn and refOut are set to
                either true or false for all potential polynomials of the given
                length). Please be patient! Both options -q and -e are required
                in this case.
                Available since Jacksum 3.0.0, see also -V, -e, -E, -q


    -A
    --alternative
            By default Jacksum uses algorithms provided by the Java API if
            available, because those are optimized by your JVM vendor and
            usually they provide a very good performance.
            If -A is set, Jacksum uses an alternate, pure Java implementation of
            an algorithm (if available). Actually Jacksum supports alternate
            implementations for the following algorithms:
            adler32, crc32, md2, md5, sha-1, sha-256, sha-384, sha-512
            Available since Jacksum 1.5.0, see also -a


    --bom
            adds a Byte-Order Mark (BOM) to the output if option --charset-stdout
            or option --charset-output-file has been set to one of the following
            charsets:

                - GB18030
                - UTF-8
                - UTF-16BE
                - UTF-16LE
                - UTF-32LE
                - UTF-32BE

            If --bom is omitted, a BOM won't be written for the charsets above,
            because a BOM isn't required and it is optional in those cases.
            Note that if you set charsets UTF-16 or UTF-32, a BOM will be
            written in any case, even if you don't set --bom, because it is
            required for those charsets to have a BOM in the output.
            See also --utf8


    -c <file>
    --check-file <file>
            Verify (check) files against a list of hashes. The list can either
            be a former output of Jacksum or an output of a different hash
            application.
            You have to specify at least the options -a and -E,
            because Jacksum must know which algorithm and which encoding
            were used when <list> was generated.
            In addition to that you need to set all options that could
            generate <list> again, e. g. the options -g, -G, -t, -d, -f may
            become necessary as well. The option -F will be ignored.

            If you have used option -F or if the output of <list> is not in the
            quasi-standard output format like

                <encoded/formatted hash><blank>[<blank or star>]<filename>

            you can specify a parser file by using the --compat option.
            The parser file must have all the definitions that are necessary
            to parse <file> properly. For more information see also option -C.

            If <file> is set to a single dash (-) Jacksum reads from stdin.
            Use option --charset-check-file to specify the character set for
            <file>.

            You can use the option -I in order to ignore all lines that start
            with a particular string in <file>.

            To exclude files from being checked, just remove the lines from the
            list. This can be done with findstr /V (on Windows) and with grep -v
            (on both Linux and Unix). Example: check all files in md5.check, but
            exclude any .iso  files:
            findstr /V .iso$ hashes.md5 | jacksum -E hex -a md5 -c -

            For each file in <list> Jacksum shows the status of the file's
            integrity and the filename. The status can be one of the following:

                OK
                   the file's fingerprint hasn't changed, the checksum that has
                   been calculated is still the same checksum as the one that is
                   in stored in the <list>. If <list> also contains filesizes
                   and/or timestamps, filesizes and/or timestamps are being
                   compared as well and must match in order to return an OK.

                FAILED
                   a mismatch between the calculated checksum and the checksum
                   in the <list>. Usually it means that the file's content has
                   been changed. If <list> contains also filesizes and/or
                   timestamps, filesizes and/or timestamps are being compared
                   as well. If one of those don't match, FAILED is being
                   returned. In that case additional information is printed to
                   stderr. You can disable that additional information by
                   setting the option "--verbose noinfo"

                MISSING
                   a file that is stored in <list>, but cannot be found on the
                   file system anymore. Usually those files have been renamed,
                   moved to a different location or even removed.
                   If you see only MISSING lines, it could mean that your
                   current working directory differs from the one that was
                   used when <list> was created. Make sure that your working
                   directory is set correctly.

                NEW
                   a new file that cannot be found in the <list> but on the file
                   system. Usually those are the files that have been created
                   after the <list> was created. In order to find NEW files you
                   have to specify all locations that were used to generate the
                   <list>. This can be done by adding locations as program
                   arguments or with the option called --file-list.

            If you want to filter the output by one or more statuses, you can
            set the option --list-filter <filter>
            If you don't want the status at all in the output, you can you can
            set the option --list and just only the filenames are printed.

            After the filenames (and by default the status for each file) have
            been printed out as a separate line, a short summary with statistics
            is printed out, because usually you don't want to miss that info
            during a verification check. This is because the verbose control
            is set to "info,warnings,summary" if option -c is set.
            Set --verbose nosummary if you want to disable the summary.

            If at least one mismatch is found during checksum verification,
            the program returns an error code of 1.
            If at least one error is found during the process, the program
            returns an error code greater than 1.
            Improperly formatted lines are ignored with respect to the exit code
            unless you set --check-strict.
            Available with the features above since Jacksum 3.0.0,
            see also the options -C, -I, --list-filter


    --check-line <string>
            take a <string> from the command line and treat it as the line would
            come from a check file.
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    --check-strict
            When verifying integrity, if one or more input line is invalid,
            exit nonzero after all warnings have been issued.
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    -C <compatibility style>
    --compat <compatibility style>
    --style <compatibility style>
            Specifies the compatibility behaviour of Jacksum for both input
            format and output format. Replace <compatibility> with one of the
            predefined keywords ad described below in order to get a predefined
            behaviour or replace it with a file that contains the properties
            that are required for a compatibility file.
            To get the properties of one of the predefined compatibility files,
            add the option --info. Example: `jacksum -C bsd --info`
            <compatibility> can be used for the hashing mode, the check mode
            and the info mode.

            calculating hash values mode:
                During normal hashing of files/messages the <compatibility
                style> determines the actual output format only. The algorithm
                (--algorithm), the encoding for the representation of the hash
                value (--encoding), and the format (--format) are used as
                defined in <compatibility style>.

                If <compatibility style> supports the algorithm to be specified
                by the user you can set option -a to get the expected output
                format defined in <compatibility style> but with the algorithm
                you want. For example, that allows you to print sha3-256 hashes
                in the legacy sfv format.

                if <compatibility style> supports the GNU file name escaping
                formatter to be enabled by the user, you can set option
                --gnu-filename-escaping to tag all lines that contain file names
                that have been escaped by that feature.

            verify hash values mode:
                Jacksum can not only read output that has been produced by
                itself, it is also able to read output produced by other tools.
                For being compatible with both well and not so well known
                tools, you can specify one of the predefined build-in parsers
                or define your own parser by providing a short property file.

                In check mode (if option -c resp. --check-file has been set),
                the <compatibility style> determines the parser that is used to
                read the file content properly. With -C you can check against a
                list that was created by a different application or if you have
                generated a list with Jacksum and the -F option was in use.

                To specify the character set of the actual input file use the
                option --charset-check-file if the input file was not saved in
                the character set UTF-8.

                You can also write you own parser definition, save it to a text
                file and specify the location of the file with -C.

            info mode:
                In info mode (if option --info has been set), all properties
                in the compatibility file are printed out.


            For <compatibility style> the following predefined compatibility
            files are supported:

                bsd
                    Aliases: bsd-tagged, linux-tagged, gnu-linux-tagged
                    A common lightweight plain text file format on BSD systems
                    and GNU/Linux. The algorithm info is stored in the file
                    (therefore it is called "tagged").

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output like
                    that of the programs

                        - md5, sha1, sha224, sha256, sha384, sha512,
                          sha512t256, rmd16, skein256, skein512, skein1024
                          on BSD systems
                        - md5sum, sha1sum, sha224sum, sha256sum, sha384sum,
                          sha512sum, b2sum, etc. with the --tag
                          option on Unix and GNU/Linux
                        - cksum on GNU/Linux with GNU Core Utilities 9.0
                          and later

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it also works with concatenated algorithms.
                    GNU escaping can be disabled, see also option
                    --gnu-filename-escaping.
                    If you don't specify -a, the algo defaults to sha3-256.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                bsd-r
                    Alias: bsd-untagged, bsd-reversed
                    A common lightweight plain text file format on BSD systems.
                    The algorithm info is not stored in the file
                    (therefore it is called "untagged"). The BSD reversed mode
                    format is similar to the GNU untagged format, but doesn't
                    use a character to distinguish binary and text modes.

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output like
                    that of the programs

                        - md5, sha1, sha224, sha256, sha384, sha512,
                          sha512t256, rmd16, skein256, skein512, skein1024
                          with the -r option on BSD systems

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms.
                    GNU escaping can be disabled, see also option
                    --gnu-filename-escaping.
                    If you don't specify -a, the algo defaults to sha3-256.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                fciv
                    File Checksum Integrity Verifier. It is a lightweight plain
                    text file format from Microsoft.

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output like
                    that of the calls "FCIV -sha1" or "FCIV -md5" on Microsoft
                    Windows.

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms. If
                    you don't specify -a, the algorithm defaults to sha1,
                    because that is the strongest algorithm that FCIV supports.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                gnu-linux
                    Aliases: linux, linux-untagged, gnu-linux-untagged
                    A common lightweight plain text file format on GNU/Linux
                    and macOS, without algorithm info in the file (untagged).

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output like
                    that of the programs

                        - md5sum, sha1sum, sha224sum, sha256sum, sha384sum,
                          sha512sum, shasum, sha3sum, b2sum, etc. on Unix and
                          GNU/Linux
                        - cksum with the --untagged option set on GNU/Linux
                          with the GNU Core Utilities 9.0 and later
                        - shasum on macOS

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms.
                    GNU escaping can be disabled, see also option
                    --gnu-filename-escaping.
                    The binary mode tag is set to '*' on Windows, and ' ' on
                    non-Windows systems.
                    If you don't specify -a, the algorithm defaults to sha3-256.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                openssl-dgst
                    Aliases: openssl, openssl-tagged
                    A lightweight plain text file format used by openssl.

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output
                    like that of the openssl program with dgst parameter.

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms.
                    GNU escaping can be disabled, see also option
                    --gnu-filename-escaping.
                    If you don't specify -a, the algorithm defaults to sha3-256.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                openssl-dgst-r
                    Aliases: openssl-r, openssl-untagged
                    A lightweight plain text file format used by openssl.

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output
                    like that of the openssl program with program arguments
                    "dgst -r" which prints the digest in coreutils format.
                    The binary mode flag is set always to "*", even on
                    GNU/Linux.

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms.
                    GNU escaping can be disabled, see also option
                    --gnu-filename-escaping.
                    If you don't specify -a, the algorithm defaults to sha3-256.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                sfv
                    Simple File Verification. It is a legacy, lightweight plain
                    text file format, without algorithm info in the file. It was
                    initially designed for crc32 only.

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms.
                    If you don't specify -a, the algorithm defaults to crc32,
                    because it is the algorithm that was used during the
                    original design of the SFV format.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                solaris-digest
                    Alias: solaris-untagged
                    A lightweight plain text file format on Solaris with
                    algorithm info in the file.

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output like
                    that of the tagged call "digest -a <algo>" on Solaris.

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms.
                    If you don't specify -a, the algorithm defaults to sha3-256.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


                solaris-digest-v
                    Alias: solaris-tagged
                    A lightweight plain text file format on Solaris without
                    algorithm info in the file.

                    This compatibility file can print and parse the output like
                    that of the untagged call "digest -v -a <algo>" on Solaris.

                    The compat file works with any algorithm that is supported
                    by Jacksum, it works even with concatenated algorithms. If
                    you don't specify -a, the algorithm defaults to sha3-256.
                    Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


            A dragon view about the features of the <compatibility styles>:

                <compatibility>    |algo |algo |hash |file |file |file |
                                   |selec|name |value|size |time |name |
                                   |table|in   |encod|     |stamp|escap|
                                   |     |file |ing  |     |     |ing  |
                ___________________|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|_____|
                default            |  *  |  -  |  *  |  d  |  d  |  e  |
                bsd                |  *  |  E  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  e  |
                bsd-r              |  *  |  -  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  e  |
                fciv               |  *  |  -  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  -  |
                gnu-linux          |  *  |  -  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  e  |
                openssl-dgst       |  *  |  E  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  e  |
                openssl-dgst-r     |  *  |  -  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  e  |
                sfv                |  *  |  -  |  H  |  -  |  -  |  -  |
                solaris-digest     |  *  |  -  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  d  |
                solaris-digest-v   |  *  |  E  |  h  |  -  |  -  |  d  |

                Legend: * = any
                        - = not available
                        d = disabled by default, can be enabled
                        e = enabled by default, can be disabled
                        E = enabled by default, cannot be disabled
                        h = hex
                        H = hex, uppercase


    --charset-check-file <charset>
    --check-file-charset <charset>
            Specifies the charset for the file that you can specify with -c.
            If you don't specify this option, UTF-8 will be used for the check
            file. See also options --check-file, --check-line, and --compat.
            If you have a file that was created by a redirection on Microsoft
            10, Windows PowerShell 5.1, you should set <charset> to UTF-16le for
            example. An ordinary OpenJDK 11 implementation usually provides more
            than 170 different charsets. The available charsets can be printed
            out by `jacksum --info`.

            The Unicode aware charsets are

                GB18030
                    is a Chinese government standard. If a Byte-Order Mark (BOM)
                    is found it will be ignored, because a BOM in GB18030 is not
                    required.

                UTF-8
                    8-bit UCS Transformation Format. If a Byte-Order Mark (BOM)
                    is found, it will be ignored, because a BOM in UTF-8 is
                    not required.

                UTF-16
                    16-bit UCS Transformation Format, byte order identified
                    by an optional byte-order mark, it defaults to big-endian
                    if there is no byte-order mark.

                UTF-16BE
                    16-bit UCS Transformation Format, big-endian byte order.

                UTF-16LE
                    16-bit UCS Transformation Format, little-endian byte order.

                UTF-32
                    32-bit UCS Transformation Format, byte order identified
                    by an optional byte-order mark, it defaults to big-endian
                    if there is no byte-order mark.

                UTF-32BE
                    32-bit UCS Transformation Format, big-endian byte order.

                UTF-32LE
                    32-bit UCS Transformation Format, little-endian byte order.

            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


    --charset-file-list <charset>
    --file-list-charset <charset>
            Specifies the charset for the file that you can specify with -L.
            If you don't specify this option, UTF-8 will be used for the file
            list. See also --file-list or -L
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


    --charset-error-file <charset>
    --error-file-charset <charset>
            Specifies the charset for the error file. If you don't specify this
            option, UTF-8 will be used for the error file. See also --error-file
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


    --charset-output-file <charset>
    --output-file-charset <charset>
            Specifies the charset for the output file. If you don't specify this
            option, UTF-8 will be used for the output file. See also --output-file
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


    --charset-stderr <charset>
    --stderr-charset <charset>
            Specifies the charset for the standard error stream (stderr). If you
            don't specify this option, the default charset will be used that is
            dependent on your shell settings. See also --utf8
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


    --charset-stdout <charset>
    --stdout-charset <charset>
            Specifies the charset for the standard output stream (stdout). If
            you don't specify this option, the default charset will be used
            that is dependent on your shell settings. See also --utf8.
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0.


    --copyright
            prints out the copyrights and license information for all portions
            of the software that Jacksum licensed. See also --license.


    -d
    --dont-follow-symlinks-to-directories
            Don't follow symbolic links on directories, that means regular
            directories only. Starting with version 3, Jacksum detects file
            system cycles (a symbolic link from a sub folder to a parent folder)
            and skips folders that could cause an endless loop while a
            recursively traversal. If you set -d, Jacksum doesn't follow any
            symbolic links on directories.
            Available since Jacksum 1.5.0, see also -r, -f
            File system cycle detection available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    -e <hash>
    --expect-hash <hash>
            A sequence for the calculation is expected. Works with a file,
            standard input or option -q. Returns OK (exit code 0) or MISMATCH
            (exit code 1).
            Available since Jacksum 1.4.0
            Works also with multiple files or directories in order to find
            duplicates. In this case all findings are being printed out.
            Note that hash collisions can occur, so select the algorithm wise
            if you search for duplicates.
            The sequence can be specified case sensitive or case insensitive,
            except if Base64 encoding (by -E) has been specified, because
            Base64 is case sensitive.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -a, -q, -E, -x and -X


    -E <encoding>
    --encoding <encoding>
            Both the hash value and the sequence (see also option -q) can
            be encoded with the following encodings:

                <encoding>           description
                ________________________________________________________________

                bin                  binary

                dec                  decimal

                oct                  octal

                hex                  hexadecimal in lowercase chars (same as -x)
                                     Options -g and -G are taken into account

                hex-lowercase        alias for hex (3.0)

                hexup                deprecated in 3.0, alias for hex-uppercase

                hex-uppercase        hexadecimal in uppercase chars (same as -X)
                                     Options -g and -G are considered (3.0)

                bb                   alias for bubblebabble

                bubblebabble         BubbleBabble (used by OpenSSH and SSH2)

                base16               Base16 (RFC 4648)

                base32               Base32 (RFC 4648)

                base32-nopadding     Base32, no padding (RFC 4648) (3.0)

                base32hex            Base32hex (RFC 4648) (3.0)

                base32hex-nopadding  Base32hex, no padding (RFC 4648) (3.0)

                base64               Base64 (RFC 4648)

                base64-nopadding     Base64, no padding (RFC 4648) (3.2)

                base64url            Base64 for URL (RFC 4648) (3.0)

                base64url-nopadding  Base64 for URL, no padding (RFC4648) (3.2)

                z-base-32            z-base-32 (3.1)

            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0 if not stated otherwise,
            see also -F, -g, -G, -q, -x, -X


    -f
    --dont-follow-symlinks-to-files
            process regular files only. Don't follow symbolic links to
            files (any OS), to block devices, character devices, named pipes,
            sockets (Unix-like OS only), nor to doors (Solaris only).
            See also option -d
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    --filesize <boolean>
            by default or if this option is omitted, the file size is added to
            the output if you select an algorithm that also adds the file size
            to the output in order to be more reliable for integrity checks
            (usually that applies to simple checksums and CRCs). Also if you
            select multiple algorithms the file size will be added by default.
            If you like to control whether the file size should be added or not,
            you could use this option with the following values for <boolean>:

                yes|on|true|1|enabled    enables the file size

                no|off|false|0|disabled  disables the file size

            Available since Jacksum 3.3.0


    -F <format>
    --format <format>
            With this option you can set a customizable output format if the
            default output format does not meet your needs.

            <format> can be any text. If the text contains particular tokens,
            all tokens will be replaced with their corresponding values.
            The following tokens are supported:

                <token>                  Description
                ________________________________________________________________

                #ALGONAME                will be replaced by the name of the
                                         selected algorithm.

                #ALGONAME{<i>}           If the character called + has been used
                                         to separate multiple algorithms by
                                         option -a, the token will be replaced
                                         with the name of the algorithm. The
                                         token is indexed by a number. If you
                                         use the single character called i
                                         rather than a number, it works like
                                         an automatic index. (1.7)

                #ALGONAME{lowercase}     alias for #ALGONAME (3.0)

                #ALGONAME{<i>,lowercase} alias for #ALGONAME{i} (3.0)

                #ALGONAME{uppercase}     like #ALGONAME, but the name of the
                                         algorithm appears in uppercase. (3.0)

                #ALGONAME{<i>,uppercase} like #ALGONAME{i}, but the name of the
                                         algorithm appears in uppercase. (3.0)

                #ALGONAMES               plural. Will be replaced by the name of
                                         the selected algorithm. If multiple
                                         algorithms have been selected, each
                                         algorithm name is separated by a comma.
                                         (3.3)

                #ALGONAMES{lowercase}    like #ALGONAMES, but the name(s) of the
                                         algorithm(s) appear in lowercase. (3.3)

                #ALGONAMES{uppercase}    like #ALGONAMES, but the name(s) of the
                                         algorithm(s) appear in uppercase. (3.3)

                #BINTAG                  On Microsoft Windows this token is
                                         replaced by a '*', on all other
                                         platforms it is replaced by a ' '.
                                         (3.3)

                #ESCAPETAG               if the option called
                                         --gnu-filename-escaping is enabled, the
                                         <token> will be replaced by a single
                                         backslash. If the option is disabled
                                         (default), it will be replaced by an
                                         empty string.
                                         See also --gnu-filename-escaping  (3.3)

                #HASH                    will be replaced by the hash, CRC or
                                         checksum value (depends on the
                                         options -a, -E, -g, -G, -x, -X) (3.3)

                #HASH{<encoding>}        The token will be replaced with the
                                         encoded checksum. Replace <encoding>
                                         with a supported encoding. For valid
                                         encoding values see option -E. (1.7)

                #HASH{<i>}               If the character called + has been used
                                         to separate multiple algorithms by
                                         option -a, the token will be replaced
                                         with the checksum. The token is indexed
                                         by a number. If you use the character
                                         called i rather than a number, it works
                                         like an automatic index. (1.7)

                #HASH{<algo>}            the token will be replaced with the
                                         hash identified by its algorithm
                                         name. (3.0)

                #HASH{<i>,<encoding>}    like #HASH{<i>}, but with an explicit
                                         encoding (3.0)

                #HASH{<algo>,<encoding>} like #HASH{<algo>}, but with an
                                         explicit encoding (3.0)

                #HASHES                  plural. Token will be replaced by the
                                         hash, CRC or checksum value. If
                                         multiple algorithms have been selected,
                                         each hash value is separated by a comma
                                         (depends on the options -a, -E, -g, -G,
                                         -x, and -X) (3.3)

                #HASHES{<encoding>}      like #HASHES, but with an explicit
                                         encoding (3.3)

                #FILENAME                will be replaced by the file name and
                                         path (depends on -P)

                #FILENAME{name}          will be replaced by the file name (1.6)

                #FILENAME{path}          will be replaced by the file path (1.6)

                #FILESIZE                will be replaced by the file size

                #LENGTH                  is an alis for #FILESIZE (3.0)

                #SEPARATOR               will be replaced by the separator which
                                         you can specify with -s

                #SEQUENCE                will be replaced by the hexadecimal
                                         representation of the sequence which
                                         you can specify with -q (3.0)

                #SEQUENCE{<encoding>}    like #SEQUENCE, but with explicit
                                         encoding (3.0)

                #TIMESTAMP               will be replaced by the time stamp
                                         (depends on -t)

                #QUOTE                   will be replaced by one quote char (")

            Aliases for #HASH are #CHECKSUM, #DIGEST, and #FINGERPRINT.
            Available since Jacksum 1.5.0, if not other specified,
            see also -a, -E, -g, -G, --gnu-filename-escaping, -P, -s, -t, -x, -X


    -g <count>
    --group-bytes <count>
            group the hex output for the checksum in "count" bytes for
            better readability. Only valid if encoding is hex or hexup.
            Groups are separated by a blank or by the character
            specified by -G. The value for count must be greater than 0.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -E, -G, -x and -X


    -G <char>
    --group-bytes-separator <char>
            Sets the separator for byte groups. Only valid if encoding is
            hexadecimal and -g has been set.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -E, -g, -x and -X


    --gnu-filename-escaping <boolean>
            On GNU/Linux and Unix operating systems, file names could contain
            problematic characters such as newlines, and carriage returns.
            The GNU Coreutils suggests to escape problematic characters in file
            names with a backslash which ensures a single line per file on
            standard output. The backslash itself also needs to be escaped.
            That feature was introduced in the GNU Coreutils release 8.25 from
            January 2016.

            Jacksum supports file name escaping as suggested by GNU for the
            default output, the custom formatter (see option --format), and for
            the style formatters (see option --style).

            By default or if the option is omitted, the style that has been
            selected determines whether file name escaping is enabled or not.
            Most styles allow to toggle the feature, and you can use this option
            with the following values for <boolean> to control the actual
            behaviour explicitly:

                yes|on|true|1|enabled    enables the GNU file name escaping

                no|off|false|0|disabled  disables the GNU file name escaping

            The default style enables the feature on GNU/Linux and Unix systems
            only. On Microsoft Windows it is disabled, because on Windows
            it is not allowed to use newlines or carriage returns in filenames,
            and it makes no sense to enable it on Windows.

            If file name escaping is enabled (implicitly or explicitly) and if a
            file contains a backslash, newline, or carriage return, the line
            starts with a backslash, and the problematic characters in the file
            name are escaped with a backslash.

            Available since Jacksum 3.3.0, see also -F, token #ESCAPETAG


    --header
            prints a header as a comment. The string that is used to mark a
            line as a comment is read from the compatibility file if -C has
            been specified, or if it has been specified with option -I.
            If -C and -I are omitted, the hash sign is used.
            The header contains the following information:

                - Jacksum version, and homepage
                - JMV name, vendor, and version
                - OS name, arch, and version
                - ISO 8601 timestamp of invocation
                - working directory of invocation
                - invocation args

            Available since Jacksum 3.3.0.


    -h [language] [word]
    --help [language] [word]
            prints the help, valid code for language is en; valid values for
            word are strings like section headers, options or algorithms.
            See section EXAMPLES for more information or simply type
            'jacksum -h examples'
            Available since Jacksum 1.0.0,
            parameter word since Jacksum 1.6.0


    --info
            Returns information and exits the program.
            If -a hasn't been set it prints out

                - the program name and version
                - the Primary IDs and descriptions of all supported algorithms
                - the number of all supported algorithms
                - the default algorithm
                - the number of the supported CRC combinations
                - the supported character sets
                - the default character set
                - available processors
                - and all Java system properties

            If -a has been set it prints out additional information about the
            selected algorithm(s):

                - algorithm id
                - hash length in bits and bytes
                - blocksize in bits and bytes (if applicable)
                - CRC implementation details including poly (if applicable)
                - whether an alternate implementation has been requested,
                  whether it is available and would be used

            If -a has been set to return multiple or even all algorithms,
            and --list has been set, it prints out:

                - details for each algorithm


    -I <string>
    --ignore-lines-starting-with-string <string>
            While reading a list by -L, or -c, lines are ignored if they start
            with the string <string>.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -c


    --license
            prints out the license that the project is offered under.
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0, see also --copyright

    -l
    --list
            Enables the list view.
            If option -a is set, it lists the IDs of the algorithms only.
            If option -c and --list-filter is set, it lists the filenames only
            without the status OK, FAILED, MISSING or NEW.


    --list-filter <filter>
            Filters the output that is being produced by -c.
            <filter> has to bee one or more of the following keywords,
            separated by a comma:

                ok              show OK files
                failed          show FAILED files
                missing         show MISSING files
                new             show NEW files

                all             <filter> is set to ok,failed,missing,new
                default         <filter> is set to all
                none            does not print anything (useful if you are
                                interested in the summary only) or if you want
                                to define your own filter
                good            <filter> is set to none,ok,new
                bad             <filter> ist set to none,failed,missing

            Only if the filter is set to ok or failed or both, the hashing
            occurs. For detecting missing or new files, hashing is not required.
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0, see also -c, and --list


    -L <textfile>
    --file-list <textfile>
            Process <textfile> as a filelist. By default each line in the file
            will be treated as a filename or foldername to be processed.
            If the option --file-list-format is set to ssv, each line in the
            file will be treated as multiple filenames, separated by spaces
            or tabs.
            If <textfile> is set to "-", standard input stream is used.
            The charset UTF-8 is used to read the file unless you specify
            the charset by the option --charset-file-list.
            The option -L <textfile> can go in addition to file parameters.
            Wildcards are not supported in the <textfile>.
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    --file-list-format <format>
            Specifies the format of the file list file. If this option is
            omitted, <format> is set to list. The supported formats are:

                list    default. Each filename is stored in a separate line.

                ssv     space separated values. Each filename is separated by
                        one or more common space characters (a space or a
                        horizontal tab). A file name that contains space
                        characters has to be enclosed in double quotes. This is
                        useful if Jacksum operates in Windows' shells where
                        Jacksum isn't able to accept program arguments resp.
                        file names that contain Unicode characters.


    --legacy-stdin-name
            Starting with Jacksum 3 the standard input stream is named
            <stdin> at the output, because the single dash could also be the
            name of a file or a directory. Since the characters < and > cannot
            be used for filenames or directory names on most file systems,
            <stdin> is a great choice for naming stdin for the output.
            If you set the --legacy-stdin-name, Jacksum uses the "-" again for
            naming the standard input stream.


    --no-path
            Prints regular filenames without path information. The option is
            useful if you want to create a simple database for file
            identification purposes.

            This option has an effect during hash calculation mode only.
            This option has no effect on NTFS ADS objects.
            This option has no effect if you use a non-default output format
            already by setting options -F or -C.

            If you want to store the default output in order to perform an
            integrity check later, you shall not set this option, because
            without path information it is impossible to find the files again.
            Available since Jacksum 3.3.0, see also, -P, --path-relative-to,
            and --path-absolute


    -o <file>
    --output-file <file>
            The output of the program goes to a file rather than the standard
            output. The program exits with a warning if the file exists. The
            file which is specified by -o is excluded from the calculation
            process.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -O, -u and -U


    -O <file>
    --output-file-overwrite <file>
            Same as -o, however an existing file will be overwritten without any
            warning. See also -U.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -o, -u and -U


    --path-absolute
    --absolute
            By default paths are printed relatively if you pass relative paths
            as the program arguments, and paths are printed absolutely if you
            pass absolute paths as the program arguments. If this option is set,
            paths are printed absolutely in all cases.
            Available since Jacksum 3.3.0, see also -P, --path-relative-to,
            and --no-path


    --path-relative-to <path>
    --relative-to <path>
            By default paths are printed relatively if you pass relative paths
            as the program arguments, and paths are printed absolutely if you
            pass absolute paths as the program arguments.

            If this option is set during calculation mode, the paths of the
            file objects are printed relative to the <path>. If <path> points
            to a file rather than to a folder, the folder name of the file is
            used for <path>. If a path cannot be relativized to <path>,
            (e.g. if both paths have a different root on Microsoft Windows),
            the path is returned non-relativized.

            If this option is set during check mode, the path for each file
            object in the check file is simply prepended by <path>.
            Available since Jacksum 3.3.0, see also -P, --path-absolute,
            and --no-path


    --path-relative-to-entry <number>
    --relative-to-entry <number>
            Sets the option --path-relative-to <number>, where <number> is
            the line number that is stored in the file list, specified by
            --file-list. <number> starts at 1, and <number> has to be greater
            than 0. This option requires the option --file-list. If file list is
            empty, this option is ignored.
            Available since Jacksum 3.3.0, see also --path-relative-to


    -P <char>
    --path-separator <char>
            By default the system-dependent default name separator character is
            used. On Unix and GNU/Linux systems the character is the slash (/),
            on Microsoft Windows systems it is the back slash (\). You can
            change the default if a special output format for file names is
            required, for example to produce relative links for HTML pages on
            Microsoft Windows.
            Available since Jacksum 1.5.0, see also -F, --path-absolute,
            and --path-relative


    -q [<type>:]<sequence>
    --quick [<type>:]<sequence>
            process a sequence quickly and quit the program. The <type> can be
            used to specify the type of the sequence (text, formatted text,
            binary, hexadecimal, decimal, or file). If type is not set, the
            sequence is expected to be in hex form.
            Any of following examples (except text, unformatted) return the
            same digest of a input of 7 bytes.

                Decimal
                    dec:101,103,103,32,52,50,10
                    dec:"101, 103, 103, 32, 52, 50, 10"
                    dec:"101 103 103 32 52 50 10"

                    Decimal values have to be separated from each other by
                    comma or spaces.

                Binary
                    bin:1100101,1100111,1100111,100000,110100,110010,1010
                    bin:"1100101, 1100111, 1100111, 100000, 110100, 110010,1010"
                    bin:"1100101 1100111 1100111 100000 110100 110010 1010"
                    bin:1100101011001110110011100100000001101000011001000001010

                    Binary values can be separated by commas or spaces,
                    but you do not have to, as long as it is clear,
                    where the 8 bit boundaries are. If necessary you have to
                    fill up with leading zeros as the last example illustrates.

                Hexadecimal
                    6567672034320A
                    hex:6567672034320A
                    hex:65,67,67,20,34,32,A
                    hex:"65, 67, 67, 20, 34, 32, A"
                    hex:"65 67 67 20 34 32 A"

                    Hex values can be separated by commas or spaces, but you do
                    not have to, as long as it is clear, where the 8 bit
                    boundaries are. If necessary you have to fill up with
                    leading zeros as the last two examples illustrates.

                Text, unformatted:
                    txt:"egg 42\n"

                    If <type> is only specified as "txt", the default character
                    set of the platform used to represent the sequence seq.
                    For unformatted text, the \n is not interpreted as one
                    character (Newline), but rather as two separate characters
                    (backslash and "n"). Accordingly, the sequence above
                    represents an input of 8 bytes and not 7 bytes.

                Text, formatted:
                     txtf:"egg 42\n"
                     txtf:"egg 42\x0A"

                     If type is specified as "txtf", UTF-8 will be used to
                     interpret the sequence seq as formatted text.
                     The following escape sequences are interpreted accordingly:

                     \n    New Line (0x0A)
                     \r    Carriage Return (0x0D)
                     \t    Horizontal Tab (0x09)
                     \"    Double Quote (0x22)
                     \'    Single Quote (0x27)
                     \\    Backslash (0x5C)
                     \xHH  Hexadecimal Number (HH can become 00 to 7F)

                File:
                     file:<file>

                     If <type> is specified as "file", all bytes from the
                     <file> will be read and kept in memory.
                     The -q option is also used to feed data to the
                     algorithm finder module which tries to find the algorithm
                     to a checksum/CRC/hash value. It does that by processing
                     data using a brute force algorithm, and I/O operations
                     must be avoided where possible in that case. Therefore
                     the size of <file> is limited to 128 MiB, because the
                     entire content of the file will be stored in memory for
                     fast access. This option is not intended for reading in
                     large files. If you want to read large files up to
                     8 Exbibytes (= 8,000,000,000 Gibibytes) pass <file> as
                     a parameter to Jacksum.

            Available since Jacksum 1.3.0 (hex only), "type" since 1.5.0,
            type "bin" and "txtf" since Jacksum 3.0.0, type "file" since
            Jacksum 3.1.0


    --scan-all-unix-file-types
            This option has an effect on Unix-like operating systems only.
            By default Jacksum reads from regular files, directories, and
            symbolic links during recursively directory on all supported
            platforms.
            You can change the behaviour of following symbolic links by
            setting the options -f and/or -d.

            In Unix-like operating systems there are additional file types
            available. "Everything is a file" describes one of the defining
            features of Unix, and its derivatives. And since everything is
            a file and if you set this option, Jacksum will also calculate
            message digests from

                - block devices (i.e. disks, and partitions)
                - character devices (e.g. /dev/null)
                - named pipes (FIFOs)
                - sockets
                - doors (Solaris only)

            if those are found during recursively directory traversal.
            Jacksum doesn't read from those file types during recursively
            directory traversal by default, because it could make the process
            waiting on data forever (e.g. a named pipe without a producer),
            reading data forever (e.g. /dev/random which generates an infinite
            number of random numbers) or hashing entire disks or partitions
            which you didn't want to hash by default. Note that setting this
            option makes the output platform-dependent.
            Use this option with care and wisdom.


    --scan-ntfs-ads
            This option has an effect on Microsoft Windows only.
            NTFS Alternate Data Streams (ADS) can be attached to both files and
            directories. By default Jacksum doesn't look for ADS.
            If you set this option, Jacksum scans for ADS and calculates
            hashes for those. The option -r <depth> is being respected.
            Note that setting this option makes the output platform-
            dependent if ADS can be found.


    -r <depth>
    --recursive <depth>
            process subdirectory recursively with a specific depth. The <depth>
            can be "max" or a number > 0. If -r is not set at all, <depth> is
            set to "max" implicitly. If -r is explicitly set, the current
            working directory is used if you don't specify a file parameter.
            Available since Jacksum 1.0.0.
            The <depth> is available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    -s <string>
    --separator <string>
            a custom separator string (\t, \n, \r, \", \' and \\ will be
            translated). The default value depends on the checksum algorithm,
            usually it is a single blank.

            You can set <string> to any string that you like, but if you want
            Jacksum to parse the output again using the -c option, you shall
            set the separator to a string which allows Jacksum to parse the
            output properly again. Jacksum won't tell you that your choice is
            suboptimal if you choose a suboptimal separator sequence.

            Therefore here are some recommendations:
            You shall avoid \n, and \r, because that will prevent a successful
            line by line read. Also avoid the /, and the \\, because Jacksum
            won't be able to detect where the path begins. Also you shall
            avoid a character sequence that could be part of a the encoding
            character set for hashes, such as a-z, 0-9 for hex, and the char
            that you specified with -G if you also set -g. The same applies
            to A-Z, 0-9 for hex-uppercase, = for base64, - for bb, etc.
            Also you shall avoid a character sequence that could be part of
            the file size (0-9) or the timestamp (depends on the -t setting)
            for the same reasons.

            Examples that are perfectly fine to use in most cases are
            " ", "\t", ",", ";", ":", "~", "@", "_" or any other sequence
            that makes the separator unique such as "  ", ", ", "; ", "\t\t",
            "---", "...", etc.

            If the default parser isn't able to parse the output you still
            could write your own compatibility file, see also -C.
            Available since Jacksum 1.0.0, see also -F


    --threads-hashing <threads>
            if multiple algorithms have been selected for calculation or
            verification, the value of <threads> sets the maximum number
            of parallel hashing threads. Each working thread can calculate
            one hash value using a particular algorithm.
            You can select more algorithms for parallelism than <threads> are
            available.
            The LPT-Algorithm (Longest Processing Time) is used which means
            that the slowest algorithm selected determines the minimum
            computation time.
            By default, if this option is omitted, or if <threads> is set to
            the value "max", <threads> is set to the number of available
            processors. You can set <threads> above the value of max, but you
            won't get better performance, because you can only use the computing
            power that is physically available.


    --threads-reading <threads>
            sets the number of parallel working reading threads. That means how
            many threads are allowed to read files from the file system at the
            same time.

            By default, if this option is omitted, <threads> is set to 1. If
            <threads> is set to 1, the output is produced in a predictable
            order. If <threads> is set to a value greater than 1, the output is
            produced in an unpredictable order, because the actual load on the
            system can affect the speed of each thread. If <threads> is set to
            the value "max", <threads> is set to the number of available
            processors.

            Recommendations:

                - Set <threads> to a large value or even to max if you want to
                  read/hash files from solid-state drives (SSD), because those
                  drives have no physical moving parts, they are fast, and they
                  benefit from multiple readers. You could set <threads> greater
                  than "max", but usually you won't get better reading
                  performance in this case.

                - Set <threads> to 1 if you want to read/hash files from HDDs,
                  CD-ROMs, DVDs, or external connected drives, because those
                  drives don't benefit from multiple readers. Actually the
                  opposite is the the case. A larger value for <threads> can
                  decrease the read performance dramatically in those cases.
                  Set <threads> to 1 if if you want the output in a predictable
                  order.


    -t <format>
    --timestamp <format>
            a timestamp format. Java's formatter class
            SimpleDateFormat will be used. Valid characters are

                G   Era designator
                y   Year
                Y   Week year
                M   Month in year (context sensitive)
                L   Month in year (standalone form)
                w   Week in year
                W   Week in month
                D   Day in year
                d   Day in month
                F   Day of week in month
                E   Day in week
                u   Day number of week (1 = Monday, ..., 7 = Sunday)
                a   Am/pm marker
                H   Hour in day (0-23)
                k   Hour in day (1-24)
                K   Hour in am/pm (0-11)
                h   Hour in am/pm (1-12)
                m   Minute in hour
                s   Second in minute
                S   Millisecond
                z   Time zone, general
                Z   Time zone, RFC 822
                X   Time zone, ISO 8601

            If form has been set to the word "default", timestamps are
            formatted as "yyyyMMddHHmmssSSS".
            Available since Jacksum 1.3.0, including milliseconds since
            Jacksum 3.0.0

            If form has been set to the word "unixtime", timestamps are
            being formatted by the POSIX time (the number of seconds that
            have elapsed since midnight (UTC), 1 January 1970).
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0

            If form has been set to the word "unixtime-ms", timestamps are
            being formatted by the POSIX time (the number of milliseconds that
            have elapsed since midnight (UTC), 1 January 1970).
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0

            If form has been set to "iso8601", timestamps are being formatted
            by "yyyy-MM-dd'T'HH:mm:ss.SSSXXX" in order to be compatible with
            ISO 8601.

                #SEPARATOR         will be replaced by the separator which you
                                   can specify with -s
                #QUOTE             will be replaced by one quote char (")

            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -F


    -8
    --utf8
            sets the UTF-8 charset for both stdout stream and stderr stream.
            It is actually a shortcut for

            --charset-stdout UTF-8
            --charset-stderr UTF-8

            Note that you have to change the shell's default charset as well if
            your shell's default charset is not UTF-8 and you want to be
            compatible with this setting. On Microsoft Windows you can change
            that by changing the code page by entering: CHCP 65001
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    -u <file>
    --error-file <file>
            ugly, undesirable, unforeseen, uninvited. Any error messages of the
            program go to a file rather than to standard error.
            The <file> is excluded from the calculation process.
            The program exits if the file exists.
            You can set <file> to /dev/null (on Unix and GNU/Linux) or to
            nul (on Microsoft Windows) in order to ignore the output.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -U, -o and -O
            Starting with Jacksum 3.0.0 the file encoding is UTF-8


    -U <file>
    --error-file-overwrite <file>
            ugly, undesirable, unforeseen, uninvited. Any error messages of the
            program go to a file rather than to standard error.
            An existing file will be overwritten without any warning.
            You can set <file> to /dev/null (on Unix and GNU/Linux) or to
            nul (on Microsoft Windows) in order to ignore the output.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0, see also -u, -o and -O
            Starting with Jacksum 3.0.0 the file encoding is UTF-8


    -v
    --version
            Prints the product name and version and exits the program.
            Option is available since Jacksum 1.2.0
            Additional information about the copyright and license will be
            printed out if verbose info output is requested.
            Examples: "jacksum -v --verbose info" or "jacksum --info"
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    -V <control set>
    --verbose <control set>
            <control> has to be at least one and can be more than one of the
            following keywords separated by a comma:

                info               enable info
                warnings           enable warnings
                errors             enable errors
                summary            print summary at the end

                noinfo             disable info
                nowarnings         disable warnings
                noerrors           disable errors
                nosummary          don't print the summary at the end

                all                means info,warnings,errors,summary
                default            means noinfo,warnings,errors,nosummary
                none               means noinfo,nowarnings,noerrors,nosummary

            If you don't set --verbose, Jacksum selects a suitable <control set>
            dependent on the operation if performs. By default the <control set>
            is set to default.
            If you set one of the following options, <control set> is set to
            all, because usually you don't want to miss any information for
            those operations: --check-file, --check-line, and
            -a unknown:<length>.
            If you set option --version , <control set> ist set to none.
            If you set option --info, <control set> is set to default again.
            Available since Jacksum 1.6.0
            The keywords all and none are available since Jacksum 3.0.0


    -x
    --hex-lowercase
            lowercase hex output for the checksum, it is an alias for -E hex
            Available since Jacksum 1.1.0, see also -E


    -X
    --hex-uppercase
            uppercase hex output for the checksum, it is an alias for -E hexup
            Available since Jacksum 1.1.0, see also -E


    -
            a single dash is used to signify that Jacksum should read from
            standard input (stdin). Bytes are read from the standard input in
            binary mode. The filename is set to "<stdin>". Example:
            jacksum - < your.iso


    --
            a double dash is used to signify the end of command options, after
            which only positional arguments are accepted.
            Example use: Let's say you want to get all checksums for files in
            the folder called '-'. For the string '-' normally '-' will be
            considered the option to read from stdin, but with '--' you can calc
            checksums in that folder like this:
            jacksum -- -
            Available since Jacksum 3.0.0

ALGORITHMS

    The following algorithms are supported:

    adler32, adler-32
            algorithm:
                Adler-32

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                checksum

            published:
                1995

            comment:
                Adler32 was invented by Mark Adler in 1995. The specification
                for Adler32 may be found in RFC 1950. Adler32 is a 32-bit
                extension and improvement of the Fletcher algorithm, used in the
                ITU-T X.224 / ISO 8073 standard. The default encoding is
                decimal. Note that an Adler8, an Adler16 or an Adler64-
                algorithm never have been suggested by Mark Adler.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - eComStation:     -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - Haiku:           -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            java.util.zip.Adler32
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - openSUSE:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("adler32", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Python:          zlib.adler32
                - SCO UnixWare:    -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Tru64:           -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.0.0, alias "adler-32" since 1.2.0

            implementation:
                java.util.zip.Adler32 as provided by the JDK.
                The alternate implementation from net.jacksum.algorithms is used
                if option -A has been specified.


    blake<length>, blake-<length>
            algorithm:
                BLAKE-<length>

            length:
                224, 384, 256 or 512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                12/2010

            website:
                https://131002.net/blake/

            comment:
                BLAKE is one of the five hash functions that make it in the
                final round of the NIST SHA-3 competition. This is the
                implementation of the submission to the third and final round
                of the NIST SHA-3 competition. BLAKE has not been selected as a
                base for SHA-3, but since 12/2012 there exists an extended
                version called BLAKE2.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.BLAKE<length>


    blake2b, blake2b-<length>, b2sum, b2sum-<length>
            algorithm:
                BLAKE2b

            length:
                freely selectable, as long as it is a multiple of 8 and not
                greater than 512. If <length> is omitted, <length> is set to 512

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                12/2012

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://blake2.net

            comment:
                BLAKE2b is the successor of BLAKE-512.

                Use -C tagged or -F "BLAKE2b (#FILENAME) = #DIGEST" to get the
                "cksum -a blake2b" output format from the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/b2sum [-l <length>]
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd (GNU Coreutils 8.26+ 11/2016):
                                   /usr/bin/b2sum [-l <length>]
                - GNU/Hurd (GNU Coreutils 9.0+ 09/2021):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a blake2b [-l <length>]
                - GNU/Linux (GNU Coreutils 8.26+ 11/2016):
                                   /usr/bin/b2sum [-l <length>]
                - GNU/Linux (GNU Coreutils 9.0+ 09/2021):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a blake2b [-l <length>]
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - openSUSE:        /usr/bin/b2sum [-l <length>]
                - OpenSSL 1.1.0+:  openssl dgst -blake2b512
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Python 3.6+:     hashlib.blake2b
                - Solaris:         -
                - Tru64:           -
                - Ubuntu 17.04+:   /usr/bin/b2sum [-l <length>]
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                 Jacksum 3.0.0


    blake2s, blake2s-<length>
            algorithm:
                BLAKE2s

            length:
                freely selectable, as long as it is a multiple of 8 and not
                greater than 256. If <length> is omitted, <length> is set to 256.

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                12/2012

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://blake2.net

            comment:
                BLAKE2s is the successor of BLAKE-256.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.0+:  openssl dgst -blake2s256
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Python 3.6+:     hashlib.blake2s
                - Solaris:         -
                - Tru64:           -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.Blake2s


    blake3, blake3-256
            algorithm:
                BLAKE3

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                01/2020

            broken:
                no
            website:
                https://github.com/BLAKE3-team/BLAKE3

            comment:
                BLAKE3 is a single algorithm, in contrast to BLAKE and BLAKE2,
                which are algorithm families with multiple variants.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.0+:  -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Python 3.6+:     -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Tru64:           -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                io.github.rctcwyvrn.blake3


    cksum
            algorithm:
                POSIX 1003.2 CRC algorithm

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                checksum, based on CRC

            comment:
                The default encoding is decimal.
                G(x) = x^32 + x^26 + x^23 + x^22 + x^16 + x^12 +
                       x^11 + x^10 + x^8 + x^7 + x^5 + x^4 + x^2 + x +1
                The Posix CRC cannot be described completely by the
                Rocksoft-Model, because the algorithm includes the length to
                the CRC. Without this special, the code would be:
                crc:32,04C11DB7,0,false,false,FFFFFFFF
                With the additional length parameter it can be expressed as
                crc:32,04C11DB7,0,false,false,FFFFFFFF,false

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            /bin/cksum
                - BusyBox:         /bin/cksum
                - CentOS:          /bin/cksum
                - DragonFly BSD:   /usr/bin/cksum
                - eComStation:     C:\ecs\KLIBC\bin\cksum
                - FreeBSD:         /usr/bin/cksum
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/cksum
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a crc
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/cksum
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a crc
                - Haiku:           /bin/cksum
                - HP-UX:           /usr/bin/cksum
                                   /usr/bin/sum -p
                - IBM AIX:         /usr/bin/cksum
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/cksum
                - macOS:           /usr/bin/cksum
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/cksum
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/cksum
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/sum -a crc
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a crc
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Python:          -
                - SCO UnixWare:    /bin/cksum
                - Solaris:         /usr/bin/cksum
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=cksum
                - Tcl:             crc::cksum
                - Tru64:           CMD_ENV=xpg4;export CMD_ENV; /bin/cksum
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                 Jacksum 1.0.0

            implementation:
                 crc:32,04C11DB7,0,false,false,FFFFFFFF,false


    cksum_minix
            algorithm:
                cksum algorithm on Minix 3.2.0 and earlier

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                checksum

            comment:
                This is the Minix cksum implementation until Minix 3.2.0.
                It cannot be described by the Rocksoft-Model, because the
                algorithm uses a modified update method. It also differs to the
                common cksum algorithm, because it doesn't corporate the message
                length into the crc and it also uses a different polynomial.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix 3.2.0:     /usr/bin/cksum
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Tru64:           -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0


    crc:<width,poly,init,refIn,refOut,xorOut[,incLen[,xorLen]]>
            algorithm:
                CRC (generic)

            length:
                8..64 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                With this generic CRC you can specify all CRC-algorithms which
                can be described by the famous "Rocksoft (tm) Model CRC
                Algorithm". The default encoding is decimal. Parameters after
                crc: must have at least 6, and can have 7 or 8 values. All
                values have to be separated by a comma. The required parameters
                are: width,poly,init,refIn,refOut,xorOut. The optional
                parameters are incLen, and xorLen.

                    width
                        width of the crc, expressed in bits. This is one less
                        than the width of the poly.

                    poly
                        the polynomial, specify as hex. The top bit of the poly
                        should be omitted. For example, if the poly is 10110,
                        you should specify 6. An important aspect of this
                        parameter is that it represents the unreflected poly;
                        the bottom bit of this parameter is always the LSB of
                        the divisor during the division regardless of whether
                        the algorithm being modelled is reflected.
                        In other words, for the normal representation of the
                        generator polynomial the most significant bit (=x^n)
                        of the generator polynomial is left out in the
                        hexadecimal representation (as it's always 1). The
                        hexadecimal polynomial contains only the coefficients
                        x^(n-1) ... x^0.

                    init
                        this parameter specifies the initial value of the
                        register when the algorithm starts. Specify as hex.

                    refIn
                        this is a boolean parameter. If it is false, input
                        bytes are processed with bit 7 being treated as the
                        most significant bit (MSB) and bit 0 being treated as
                        the least significant bit. If this parameter is false,
                        each byte is reflected before being processed.
                        true or false

                    refOut
                        this is a boolean parameter. If it is set to false, the
                        final value in the register is fed into the xorOut
                        stage directly, otherwise, if this parameter is true,
                        the final register value is reflected first.

                    xorOut
                        this value is XORed to the final register value (after
                        the refOut) stage before the value is returned as the
                        official checksum, specify as hex

                Normally here ends the parameter list for the "Rocksoft (tm)
                Model CRC Algorithm" schema. However, the Jacksum project
                supports two additional parameters which can be optionally
                specified in order to take the fact into account that some
                famous CRCs (such as POSIX cksum, the FDDI CRC resp. the Plan 9
                sum) include the length of the file to the checksum value.
                Those are the parameters which can be separated by a comma:

                    incLen
                        this is a boolean parameter. It is optional. If it is
                        omitted, no length is included to the CRC. If it is
                        set, one or more octets representing the length of the
                        file as a binary value, will be used to include the
                        length of the file to the checksum value (before the
                        refOut). If it is set to true, the most significant
                        octet of the length will be processed first to the
                        update method of the CRC. If it is set to false, the
                        least significant octet of the length will be processed
                        first to the update method of the CRC.

                    xorLen
                        this value is XORed to the length value before it gets
                        included to the CRC. Specify xorLen as hex. If xorLen
                        is omitted, the smallest number of octets capable of
                        representing the length of the file are being
                        processed. If xorLen is set, the exact number of bytes
                        are being processed that are required to store the
                        xorLen value.

            since:
                Available since Jacksum 1.7.0,
                incLen and xorLen since Jacksum 3.0.0


    crc8, crc-8
            algorithm:
                CRC-8

            length:
                8 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                this implementation of the CRC-8 (cyclic redundancy check) is
                used in the System Management Bus (SMBus) and the Free Lossless
                Audio Codec (FLAC) for example.
                Generator poly is x^8 + x^2 + x^1 + 1.
                The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

             implementation:
                8,7,0,false,false,0


    crc16, crc-16
            algorithm:
                CRC-16 (ARC)

            length:
                16 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                this implementation of the CRC-16 (cyclic redundancy check) is
                the most popular form of CRC-16 algorithms.
                The generator poly is x^16 + x^15 + x^2 + 1.
                It is used by LHA, and ARC for example.
                The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.2.0

            implementation:
                crc:16,8005,0,true,true,0


    crc16_x25, crc-16_x-25, fcs16, fcs-16
            algorithm:
                CRC-16 (Frame Checking Sequence)

            length:
                16 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                The Frame Checking Sequence as defined in RFC1331.
                The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.5.0 (aliases _x25 and _x-25 since 1.7.0)

            implementation:
                crc:16,1021,FFFF,true,true,FFFF


    crc16_minix, crc-16_minix
            algorithm:
                Minix' crc

            length:
                16 bits

            type:
                checksum

            comment:
                this is the Minix' crc algorithm. It cannot be entirely
                described by the Rocksoft-Model, because it uses a non-standard
                update method which won't be fixed due to compatibility reasons.
                See also https://jacksum.net/downloads/minix-bug-151.txt
                or https://bit.ly/minix-bug-id-151

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix 1.3+:      /usr/bin/crc
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Tru64:           -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                based on crc:16,1021,0,false,false,0


    crc24, crc-24
            algorithm:
                CRC-24

            length:
                24 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                this implementation of the CRC-24 (cyclic redundancy check) is
                used by Open PGP for example (RFC 2440).
                The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0
            implementation:
                crc:24,864CFB,B704CE,false,false,0


    crc32, crc-32, fcs32, fcs-32
            algorithm:
                CRC-32

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                the standard algorithm CRC-32 (cyclic redundancy check) is
                specified in ISO 3309, ISO/IEC 13239:2002 and ITU-T V.42, and it
                is used by PKZip, gzip, png, Ethernet and WEP. That algorithm is
                also known as FCS (frame checking sequence).
                The default encoding is decimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z (hex only):   7z h -scrccrc32
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   /usr/bin/cksum -o 3
                - FreeBSD:         /usr/bin/cksum -o 3
                - FreeDOS:         \FDOS\BIN\MD5SUM /M=crc32
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            java.util.zip.CRC32
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           /usr/bin/cksum -o 3
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("crc32b", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          zlib.crc32
                - Solaris:         -
                - Tcl:             crc::crc32
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.0.0, alias crc-32 since 1.2.0, aliases fcs32 and
                fcs-32 since 1.5.0

            implementation:
                java.util.zip.CRC32 as provided by the JDK or
                net.jacksum.algorithms.crcs.FCS32 (if option -A is set) which
                basically is an optimized version of
                crc:32,04C11DB7,FFFFFFFF,true,true,FFFFFFFF


    crc32c, crc-32c
            algorithm:
                CRC-32c (iSCSI)

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                known as "Castagnoli CRC-32", see RFC 7143, section 13.1
                (Internet Small Computer System Interface (iSCSI) Protocol):
                Guy Castagnoli, Stefan Braeuer, Martin Herrmann,
                "Optimization of Cyclic Redundancy-Check Codes with 24 and 32
                Parity Bits", IEEE Transact. on Communications, Vol. 41,
                No. 6, June 1993.
                The default encoding is decimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:               -
                - Angstrom:         -
                - BeOS:             -
                - BusyBox:          -
                - CentOS:           -
                - DragonFly BSD:    -
                - FreeBSD:          -
                - FreeDOS:          -
                - GNU/Hurd:         -
                - GNU/Linux:        -
                - gpg:              -
                - HP-UX:            -
                - Java 9+:          java.util.zip.CRC32C
                - Kali Linux:       -
                - macOS:            -
                - Minix:            -
                - MS-DOS:           -
                - NetBSD:           -
                - NextStep:         -
                - OpenSSL:          -
                - PHP 7.4.0+:       hash("crc32c", $input);
                - Plan 9:           -
                - PowerShell:       -
                - Python:           -
                - Solaris:          -
                - Windows:          -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                java.util.zip.CRC32c as provided by the JDK, or if option -A
                has been set, net.jacksum.algorithms.crcs.CrcGeneric with
                options crc:32,1EDC6F41,FFFFFFFF,true,true,FFFFFFFF


    crc32_bzip2, crc-32_bzip-2
            algorithm:
                CRC-32 (bzip2)

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                This CRC is used by bzip2. The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.7.0

            implementation:
                crc:32,04C11DB7,FFFFFFFF,false,false,FFFFFFFF


    crc32_mpeg2, crc-32_mpeg-2
            algorithm:
                CRC-32 (MPEG-2)

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                this algorithm implements the MPEG specification of the CRC-32
                calculation. The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.4.0

            implementation:
                crc:32,04C11DB7,FFFFFFFF,false,false,0


    crc32_php, crc-32_php
            algorithm:
                CRC-32 (PHP's crc32)

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                PHP's crc32. This is actually the CRC-32 that is also used by
                bzip2, but the 4 bytes for the output are being mirrored.
                Accordingly, this CRC cannot be described by the Rocksoft Model
                CRC Algorithm scheme. The default encoding is decimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - eComStation:     -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("crc32", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                crc:32,04C11DB7,FFFFFFFF,false,false,FFFFFFFF
                using reflected bytes for the output


    crc32_ubi, crc-32_ubi, ubicrc32, crc32_jamcrc, crc-32_jamcrc
            algorithm:
                CRC-32 (UBICRC32 and JAMCRC)

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                ubicrc32 is part of the Memory Technology Device Utilities for
                Linux (mtd-utils). UBI (Latin: "where?") stands for "Unsorted
                Block Images". The default encoding is decimal. Specify -E hex
                in order to get the hex output that the ubicrc32 tool
                produces. This algorithm is also known as JAMCRC.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        /usr/bin/ubicrc32
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - eComStation:     -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/ubicrc32
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu (+mtd-utils): /usr/sbin/ubicrc32
                - Windows:         -

        since:
            Jacksum 3.0.0

        implementation:
            crc:32,04C11DB7,FFFFFFFF,true,true,0


    crc64, crc-64
            algorithm:
                CRC-64 (ISO 3309)

            length:
                64 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                this algorithm is described in the ISO 3309 standard and used in
                HDLC. Generator poly is x^64 + x^4 + x^3 + x + 1.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.5.0

            implementation:
                crc:64,1B,0,true,true,0 -E hex


    crc64_ecma, crc-64_ecma
            algorithm:
                CRC-64 (ECMA-182)

            length:
                64 Bits

            type:
                CRC

            published:
                1992

            standard:
                ECMA-182

            comment:
                CRC-64 as defined by the ECMA (European Computer Manufacturers
                Association) in the standard ECMA-182, Annex B, page 51.

                Used in DLT-1 tape cartridges, see also
                https://www.ecma-international.org/publications/
                files/ECMA-ST/Ecma-182.pdf

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                crc:64,42f0e1eba9ea3693,0,false,false,0 -E hex


    crc64_go-iso, crc-64_go-iso
            algorithm:
                CRC-64 (programming language GO, const ISO)

            length:
                64 Bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                Used in the crc64 package from the programming language GO.
                See also https://golang.org/pkg/hash/crc64/

                The poly is defined in ISO 3309, but for the algorithm in GO,
                only the polynomial is used from the ISO 3309. The crc
                parameters init, refin, refout, and xorOut are different.
                Note that the Go API documentation uses the reversed
                representation of the poly for the const.ISO.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                crc:64,1b,ffffffffffffffff,true,true,ffffffffffffffff -E hex


    crc64_xz, crc-64_xz, crc64_go-ecma, crc-64_go-ecma
            algorithm:
                CRC-64 (.xz, and prog lang GO, const ECMA)

            length:
                64 Bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                Used in the .xz format. See also the xz format specification,
                section 6: https://tukaani.org/xz/xz-file-format.txt

                Also used in the crc64 package from the programming language GO,
                const ECMA See also https://golang.org/pkg/hash/crc64/

                The poly is defined in the standard ECMA-182, but for the
                algorithm in GO, only the polynomial is used from ECMA. The crc
                parameters init, refin, refout, and xorOut are different.
                Note that the Go API documentation uses the reversed
                representation of the poly for the const.ECMA.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              7z h -scrccrc64
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - eComStation:     -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                crc:64,42f0e1eba9ea3693,ffffffffffffffff,true,true,ffffffffffffffff -E hex


    dha256, dha-256
            algorithm:
                DHA-256

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                11/2005

            broken:
                no

            website:
                http://www.nist.gov/hash-function (archived)
                http://csrc.nist.gov/groups/ST/hash/documents/ChangD_DHA256.pdf

            comment:
                In response to the SHA-1 vulnerability that was announced in
                Feb. 2005, NIST held a Cryptographic Hash Workshop on
                Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2005 to solicit public input on its
                cryptographic hash function policy and standards. DHA-256 was
                presented on Nov 1, 2005 by south korean scientists at this
                first NIST Hash Workshop. The NIST conducted also a second
                workshop. However, NIST did not select an algorithm immediately,
                but held a public competition from 2007 to 2012
                (SHA-3 Competition) to find a successor for SHA-1 and the
                SHA-2 family.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                de.flexiprovider.core.md.DHA256


    echo<length>, echo-<length>
            algorithm:
                ECHO
            length:
                224, 384, 256 or 512 bits
            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2008

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://crypto.orange-labs.fr/ECHO/

            comment:
                ECHO is one of 14 hash functions that had made it into the
                second round of the NIST SHA-3 competition (2007-2012).
                ECHO was submitted by France Telecom (it was rebranded as Orange
                S.A. in July 2013). ECHO did not pass the final (3rd) round of
                the NIST SHA-3 competition, but it is not broken.
                This is the latest implementation according to
                the second round of the NIST SHA-3 competition.

                ECHO must not be confused with ECOH, because ECOH is also a hash
                function that was submitted to the SHA-3 competition, but did
                not advance to round 2.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.ECHO<length>


    elf, elf32, elf-32
            algorithm:
                ELF

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                hash function

            comment:
                hash function used in the UNIX (System V Release 4) ELF
                (Executable and Linkable Format) for object files.
                The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.5.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums


    ed2k, emule, edonkey
            algorithm:
                eMule/eDonkey

            length:
                128 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                this algorithm is used in eDonkey resp. eMule, it is based on
                MD4, but returns different fingerprints for files >= 9500 KB.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.5.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.md.Edonkey


    fletcher16, fletcher-16
            algorithm:
                Fletcher's checksum

            length:
                16 bits

            type:
                checksum

            published:
                01/1982

            comment:
                published 1982 by John G. Fletcher (1934-2012). The binary
                transmitted message is divided into sections of length K, for
                Fletcher-16 is K=8, so Fletcher-16 is independent of the
                endianness, i. e. independent from the byte order of the input
                stream to of the executed hardware. The modulus of the
                calculation is M and M is in this implementation set to
                2^K-1=255 for K=8.
                The original work of John G. Fletcher examines only the case
                K=8 with modulus 255 and 256.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.Fletcher16


    fnv-0_<length>
            algorithm:
                FNV-0

            length:
                32, 64, 128, 256, 512 or 1024 bits

            type:
                non-cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1991

            comment:
                Fowler-Noll-Vo is a non-cryptographic hash function created by
                Glenn Fowler, Landon Curt Noll, and Phong Vo.
                The FNV-0 is the historic FNV algorithm that is deprecated.
                The FNV-0 hashes all buffers that contain only 0 octets to a
                hash value of 0. The FNV-1 and FNV-1a hash do not suffer from
                this minor problem. The output <length> can vary from 32
                bits to 1024 bits.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0
            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.Fnv0_32 and Fnv0_n


    fnv-1_<length>
            algorithm:
                FNV-1

            length:
                32, 64, 128, 256, 512 or 1024 bits

            type:
                non-cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1991

            comment:
                Fowler-Noll-Vo is a non-cryptographic hash function created by
                Glenn Fowler, Landon Curt Noll, and Phong Vo.
                The output <length> can vary from 32 bits to 1024 bits.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - eComStation:     -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP 5.4.0+:      hash("fnv132", $input);
                                   hash("fnv164", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -
                - OpenSSL:         -

           since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

           implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.Fnv1_32 and Fnv1_n


    fnv-1a_<length>
            algorithm:
                FNV-1a

            length:
                32, 64, 128, 256, 512 or 1024 bits

            type:
                non-cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1991

            comment:
                Fowler-Noll-Vo alternate is a non-cryptographic hash function
                created by Glenn Fowler, Landon Curt Noll, and Phong Vo.
                The only difference between the FNV-1a hash and the FNV-1 hash
                is the order of the xor and multiply in the update method.
                The output <length> can vary from 32 bits to 1024 bits.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - eComStation:     -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("fnv1a32", $input);
                                   hash("fnv1a64", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.Fnv1a_32 and Fnv1a_n


    fork256, fork-256
            algorithm:
                FORK-256

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                11/2005

            broken:
                yes

            website:
                http://www.nist.gov/hash-function (archived)
                http://www.csrc.nist.gov/pki/HashWorkshop/2005/Nov1_Presentations/Sung_FORK-256.pdf
                http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/11799313_13

            comment:
                In response to the SHA-1 vulnerability that was announced in
                Feb. 2005, NIST held a Cryptographic Hash Workshop on
                Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2005 to solicit public input on its cryptographic
                hash function policy and standards. FORK-256 was presented on
                Nov 1, 2005 at this first NIST Hash Workshop. The NIST conducted
                also a second workshop. However, NIST did not select an algorithm
                immediately, but held a public competition from 2007 to 2012
                (SHA-3 Competition) to find a successor for SHA-1 and the SHA-2
                family. Between 2006 and 2007 attacks on FORK-256 have been
                published and in response the authors improved FORK-256 under the
                name "New FORK-256". But also this one was discovered to be broken
                in 2007.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                de.flexiprovider.core.md.FORK256


    fugue<length>, fugue-<length>
            algorithm:
                Fugue

            length:
                224, 384, 256 or 512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2008

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://researcher.watson.ibm.com/researcher/view_group.php?id=3253

            comment:
                Fugue is one of 14 hash functions that had made it into the
                second round of the NIST SHA-3 competition (2007-2012). Fugue
                was submitted by IBM.
                Fugue did not pass the final (3rd) round of the NIST SHA-3
                competition, but it is not broken. This is the latest
                implementation according to the second round of the NIST SHA-3
                competition.

                IBM improved the algorithm further and it is called Fugue 2.0
                which is currently not supported by Jacksum.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.Fugue<length>


    gost, gost:<init>
            algorithm:
                GOST R 34.11-94

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1994

            broken:
                2008, see also http://dx.doi.org/10.1007/978-3-540-85174-5_10

            standard:
                GOST R 34.11-94

            comment:
                "GOsudarstvennyi STandard", Russian for "Government Standard".
                Published in 1994 as the Soviet Standard GOST R-34.11-94.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                The hash function is based on the GOST block cipher
                GOST 28147-89. If you omit <init> or if you set <init> to
                "default" it will initialize the underlying cipher with the
                default S-boxes as also described in RFC 5831 (March 2010).
                If you set <init> to "crypto-pro" it will initialize the cipher
                with the S-Boxes as suggested by the Crypto-Pro company in
                January 2006 as described in RFC 4357.
                For the GOST-Standard from 2012 see streebog.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - eComStation:     -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -md_gost94
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("gost", $input);
                - PHP 5.6.0+:      hash("gost-crypto", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0, init available since Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.GOST3411Digest


    groestl<length>, groestl-<length>
            algorithm:
                Groestl

            length:
                224, 384, 256 oder 512 Bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                01/2011

            broken:
                no

            website:
                http://www.groestl.info/

            comment:
                Groestl is one of the five hash functions that had made it into
                the final round of the NIST SHA-3 competition (2007-2012). This
                is the implementation according to the third and final round of
                the NIST SHA-3 Competition.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.Groestl<length>


    has160, has-160
            algorithm:
                HAS-160

            length:
                160 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2000

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                HAS-160 is both a cryptographic hash function and a korean
                TTA-Standard (Telecommunications and Technology Association).
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.7.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Has160 (by jonelo)


    haval, haval_<length>_<rounds>
            algorithm:
                HAVAL

            length:
                128, 160, 192, 224 or 256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1992

            broken:
                2004, but 128 bits only,
                see https://eprint.iacr.org/2004/199.pdf

            comment:
                Haval was invented by Yuliang Zheng, Josef Pieprzyk, and
                Jennifer Seberry in 1992. The Haval message-digest algorithm has
                a variable output length, with variable number of rounds. The
                output <length> can vary from 128 to 256 bits in increments of
                32 bits. The number of <rounds> can vary from 3 to 5. The
                default values (just "haval") are 128 and 3. The default
                encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - PHP:             hash("haval<length>,<rounds>", $input);
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.4.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Haval


    jh<length>, jh-<length>
            algorithm:
                JH
            length:
                224, 384, 256 oder 512 bits
            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                01/2011

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://www3.ntu.edu.sg/home/wuhj/research/jh/

            comment:
                JH is one of the five hash functions that had made it into the
                final round of the NIST SHA-3 competition (2007-2012). This is
                the implementation according to the third and final round of the
                NIST SHA-3 Competition. Author of JH is Hongjun Wu from
                Singapore.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.JH<length>


    joaat, joaat32, joaat-32
            algorithm:
                Bob Jenkins' One-at-a-Time Hash (joaat)

            length:
                32 Bits

            type:
                non-cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1997

            website:
                http://www.burtleburtle.net/bob/hash/doobs.html

            comment:
                Developed by Robert John Jenkins Junior (Bob Jenkins).

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - PHP 5.4.0+:      hash("joaat", $input);
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.Joaat32


    k12, kangaroo12, kangarootwelve
            algorithm:
                KangarooTwelve

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                XOF as a cryptographic hash function with a fixed length

            published:
                04/2018

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://keccak.team/kangarootwelve.html

            comment:
                KangarooTwelve is a extendable-output function (XOF) which
                supports arbitrary output lengths. It is derived from the Keccak
                algorithm and it has a 128-bit security strength like SHAKE128.
                A XOF can be specialized to a hash function by selecting a
                fixed output length.
                Jacksum restricts the set of the supported value for the output
                length to 256 bits in order to define a reasonable hash
                function.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD 10.4+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java 9+:         -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum --k12 --hex --outputbits 256
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  -
                - PHP 7.1+:        -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.Kangaroo


    m14, marsupilami14, marsupilamifourteen
            algorithm:
                MarsupilamiFourteen

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                XOF as a cryptographic hash function with a fixed length

            published:
                04/2018

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://keccak.team/kangarootwelve.html

            comment:
                MarsupilamiFourteen is a extendable-output function (XOF) which
                supports arbitrary output lengths. It is derived from the Keccak
                algorithm and it has a 256-bit security strength like SHAKE256.
                A XOF can be specialized to a hash function by selecting a
                fixed output length.
                Jacksum restricts the set of the supported value for the output
                length to 512 bits in order to define a reasonable hash
                function.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD 10.4+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java 9+:         -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  -
                - PHP 7.1+:        -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0
            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.Kangaroo


    keccak<length>, keccak-<length>
            algorithm:
                Keccak

            length:
                224, 256, 288, 384, or 512  bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2012

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://keccak.team/

            comment:
                Keccak (pronounced like "ketchak") was designed by Guido
                Bertoni, Joan Daemen, Michael Peeters, and Gilles Van Assche.
                Keccak is based on earlier hash function designs PANAMA and
                RadioGatún.
                On October 2, 2012, Keccak was selected as the winner of the
                NIST hash function competition.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD 10.4+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java 9+:         -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum --sha3-<length> --no-suffix --outputbits <length> --hex
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  -
                - PHP 7.1+:        -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0
            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.Keccak<length>

    kupyna-<length>
            algorithm:
                Kupyna

            length:
                256, 384, or 512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2015

            broken:
                no, see also https://eprint.iacr.org/2015/959.pdf

            standard:
                DSTU 7564:2014

            comment:
                The Kupyna hash function was approved as the new Ukrainian
                standard DSTU 7564:2014 in 2015.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

    lsh-<wordlength>-<length>
            algorithm:
                LSH (Lightweight Secure Hash)

            length:
                the actual output <length> is dependent on the <wordlength>
                value. <wordlength> can become 256 or 512 bits.
                If <wordlength> is 256, <length> can become 224 or 256.
                If <wordlength> is 512, <length> can become 224, 256, 384, or
                512.

            type:
                cryptographic hash

            published:
                2014

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://seed.kisa.or.kr/kisa/Board/22/detailView.do

            standard:
                KS X 3262

            comment:
                LSH is a national standard of South Korea (KS X 3262).

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                kr.re.nsr.crypto


    luffa<length>, luffa-<length>
            algorithm:
                Luffa v2.0.1

            length:
                224, 384, 256 or 512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                10/2009

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://www.hitachi.com/rd/yrl/crypto/luffa/

            comment:
                Luffa is one of 14 hash functions that had made it into the
                second round of the NIST SHA-3 competition (2007-2012). Luffa
                was submitted by Hitachi (and others).
                Luffa did not pass the final (3rd) round of the NIST SHA-3
                competition, but it is not broken.
                This is the latest implementation according to the second round
                of the NIST SHA-3 competition.
                (Luffa specification ver. 2.0.1 from Oct 2, 2009)

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.Luffa<length>


    md2, md2sum
            algorithm:
                MD2

            length:
                128 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1998

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                the MD2 message digest algorithm as defined in RFC 1319.
                RSA Laboratories, in their Bulletin #4, dated November 12, 1996,
                recommends to update applications away from MD2 whenever it is
                practical. Jacksum supports MD2 for compatibility and edu
                purposes. The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use option "--compat openssl" to get the openssl output format.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java 5+:         java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("MD2");
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/md2
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a md2
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md2
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/md2
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/md2
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a md2
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md2
                - PHP 5.3.0+:      hash("md2", $input);
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/md2
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -md2
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows 7+:      certutil -hashfile <file> MD2

            since:
                Jacksum 1.2.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.MD2


    md4, md4sum
            algorithm:
                MD4

            length:
                128 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1990

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                the MD4 message digest algorithm as defined in RFC 1320.
                RSA Laboratories, in their Bulletin #4, dated November 12, 1996,
                recommends that MD4 should not be used. Jacksum supports MD4 for
                compatibility and edu purposes.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use option "--compat openssl" to get the openssl output format.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -md4
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/md4
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a md4
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md4
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/md4
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/md4
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a md4
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md4
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -md4
                - PHP:             hash("md4", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=md4
                - Windows 7+:      certutil -hashfile <file> MD4

            since:
                Jacksum 1.2.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.MD4


    md5, md5sum
            algorithm:
                MD5

            length:
                128 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1991

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                The MD5 message digest algorithm was designed by Ronald Rivest
                in 1991, and it is defined in RFC 1321.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use -C solaris-untagged or -C solaris-tagged to print the
                Solaris digest style variants.
                Use -C openssl to print the openssl style.
                Use -C tagged to print the "cksum -a md5" style from
                the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/md5sum
                - Angstrom:        /usr/bin/md5sum
                - BeOS:            /bin/md5sum
                - BusyBox:         /bin/md5sum
                - CentOS:          /bin/md5sum
                - DragonFly BSD:   /sbin/md5
                - eComStation:     C:\ecs\KLIBC\bin\md5sum
                - FreeBSD:         /sbin/md5
                - FreeDOS:         \FDOS\BIN\MD5SUM [/M=md5]
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/md5sum
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md5
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/md5sum
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md5
                - gpg:             -
                - Haiku:           /bin/md5sum
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("MD5");
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/md5sum
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -md5
                - macOS:           /usr/bin/md5
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/md5
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a md5
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md5
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/md5
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/md5
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a md5
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a md5
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -md5
                - PHP:             hash("md5", $input);
                - Plan 9:          /bin/md5sum
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python 2.5+:     hashlib.md5()
                - PowerShell:      Get-FileHash -Algorithm MD5
                - Solaris 9:       /usr/sbin/md5 (package SUNWkeymg)
                - Solaris 10+:     /usr/bin/digest -a md5
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=md5
                                   /usr/bin/md5sum
                - Windows 7+:      certutil -hashfile <file> MD5
                - Visopsys:        /programs/md5

            since:
                Jacksum 1.0.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest. gnu.crypto.hash.MD5 is the
                alternate implementation and it will be used if you have set the
                option -A.


    mdc2, mdc-2
            algorithm:
                MDC-2

            length:
                128 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1987

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                The MDC2 (Modification Detection Code 2) algorithm is specified
                in the ANSI X9.31 and ISO/IEC 10118-2 standards. It works in
                conjunction with a block cipher (DES). OpenSSL can be
                configured to support MDC2. MDC2 is also used by the HBCI
                (Home Banking Computer Interface). The U.S. Patent 4,908,861
                submitted by IBM, expired on August 28, 2007. The default
                encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use option "--compat openssl" to get the openssl output format.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -mdc2
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.kapott.hbci.security.MDC2


    none
            algorithm:
                none

            length:
                0 bits

            type:
                n/a

            comment:
                Calculates no checksum, it does not read the content of files,
                it just determines the file size and time stamp if required.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0
            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.primitive.None


    panama
            algorithm:
                PANAMA

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                12/1998

            broken:
                04/2007, see also http://radiogatun.noekeon.org/panama/

            comment:
                PANAMA was designed by Joan Daemen (Belgium) and Craig Clapp
                (USA) and presented in the paper "Fast Hashing and Stream
                Encryption with PANAMA" on the 5th Fast Software Encryption
                (FSE) conference at Paris, France in 1998.
                RadioGatún is the successor of PANAMA.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.PANAMA


    radiogatun, radiogatun:<wordlen>, rg<wordlen>, rg-<wordlen>
            algorithm:
                RadioGatun[32] and RadioGatun[64]

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2006

            broken:
                no

            website:
                http://radiogatun.noekeon.org/

            comment:
                RadioGatun was designed by Guido Bertoni, Joan Daemen,
                Michael Peeters and Gilles Van Assche and presented at the
                Second Cryptographic Hash Workshop, Santa Barbara, CA, USA in
                August 2006.
                In theory <wordlen> can become 1 to 64. However only 32 and 64
                bits are implemented actually.
                The <wordlen> is optional, so radiogatun or radiogatun:64
                selects the RadioGatun[64] algorithm with 64-bit words.
                rg32 and rg-32 are aliases for radiogatun:32, and
                rg64 and rg-64 are aliases for radiogatun:64
                Keccak is the successor of RadioGatún.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                fr.cryptohash.RadioGatun32 and fr.cryptohash.RadioGatun64


    read
            algorithm:
                read

            length:
                0 bits

            type:
                n/a

            comment:
                Calculates no checksum, but it does read the content of files,
                it also determines the file size and time stamp if required.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.primitive.Read


    rmd128, rmd-128, ripemd128, ripemd-128, ripe-md128
            algorithm:
                RIPEMD-128

            length:
                128 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1996

            broken:
                2004, https://eprint.iacr.org/2004/199.pdf

            comment:
                a message digest, see also RIPEMD-160.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("ripemd128", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.2.0, alias rmd128 and rmd-128 since 1.4.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.RipeMD128


    rmd160, rmd-160, ripemd160, ripemd-160, ripe-md160
            algorithm:
               RIPEMD-160

            length:
               160 bits

            type:
               cryptographic hash function

            published:
               1996

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                RIPEMD was developed in the framework of the EU project RIPE
                (RACE Integrity Primitives Evaluation), used by GnuPG.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use option "--compat openssl" to get the openssl output format.
                format.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   /sbin/rmd160
                - FreeBSD 5.3+:    /sbin/rmd160
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             gpg --print-md ripemd160
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -ripemd160
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/rmd160
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a rmd160
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a rmd160
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/rmd160
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/rmd160
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a rmd160
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a rmd160
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -rmd160
                                   openssl dgst -ripemd
                                   openssl dgst -ripemd160
                - PHP:             hash("ripemd160", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      Get-FileHash -Algorithm RIPEMD160
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.2.0, alias rmd160 and rmd-160 since 1.4.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.RipeMD160


    rmd256, rmd-256, ripemd256, ripemd-256, ripe-md256
            algorithm:
                RIPEMD-256

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1996

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                a message digest, see also RIPEMD-160. RIPEMD-256 is as secure
                as RIPEMD-128. The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP 5.3.0+:      hash("ripemd256", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests


    rmd320, rmd-320, ripemd320, ripemd-320, ripe-md320
            algorithm:
                RIPEMD-320

            length:
               320 bits

            type:
                hash

            published:
                1996

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                a message digest, see also RIPEMD-160. RIPEMD-320 is as secure
                as RIPEMD-160. The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP 5.3.0+:      hash("ripemd320", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests


    sha0, sha-0
            algorithm:
                SHA-0

            length:
                160 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1993

            broken:
                2004

            comment:
                the Secure Hash Algorithm, as defined 1993 in the National
                Institute for Standards and Technology's Federal Information
                Processing Standard (FIPS PUB 180). It was withdrawn by NSA
                shortly after publication and was superseded by the revised
                version, published in 1995 in FIPS PUB 180-1 and commonly
                referred to as "SHA-1".
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use option "--compat openssl" to get the openssl output format.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -sha
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -sha
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Sha0 (by jonelo)


    sha-1, sha, sha1, sha1sum, sha160, sha-160, dssl
            algorithm:
                SHA-1

            length:
                160 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1995

            broken:
                02/2017, see also https://shattered.io

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 180-1

            comment:
                the Secure Hash Algorithm, as defined 1995 in the National
                Institute for Standards and Technology's Federal Information
                Processing Standard (NIST FIPS 180-1).
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use -C solaris-tagged or -C solaris-untagged to print the
                Solaris digest style variants.
                Use -C openssl to print the openssl style.
                Use -C tagged to print the "cksum -a sha1" style from
                the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.
                The alias called dss1 (Digital Subscriber Signalling System
                No. 1) is used by OpenSSL.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              7z h -scrcsha1
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/sha1sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum [-a 1]
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sha1sum
                - CentOS:          /bin/sha1sum
                - DragonFly BSD:   /sbin/sha1
                - eComStation:     C:\ecs\KLIBC\bin\sha1sum
                - FreeBSD:         /sbin/sha1
                - FreeDOS:         \FDOS\BIN\MD5SUM /M=sha
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/sha1sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum [-a 1]
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha1
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/sha1sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum [-a 1]
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha1
                - gpg:             gpg --print-md sha1
                - Haiku:           /bin/sha1sum
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-1");
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/sha1sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum [-a 1]
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -sha1
                - Mac OS X:        -
                - macOS 10.12+:    /usr/bin/shasum [-a 1]
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/sha1
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a sha1
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha1
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/sha1
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/sha1
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a sha1
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha1
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -sha1
                - PHP:             hash("sha1", $input);
                - Plan 9:          /bin/sha1sum
                - PowerShell:      Get-FileHash -Algorithm SHA1
                - Python 2.5+:     hashlib.sha1()
                - Solaris 10+:     /usr/bin/digest -a sha1
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=sha1
                                   /usr/bin/sha1sum
                - Windows 7+:      certutil -hashfile <file> SHA1

            since:
                Jacksum 1.0.0, alias sha-1 since 1.2.0, aliases sha160 and
                sha-160 since 1.5.0, aliases dss1 and sha1sum since 2.0.0,
                default algorithm since 1.5.0 for the Jacksum 1.x family.

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest as provided by the JRE.
                gnu.crypto.hash.Sha160 is the alternate implementation and it
                will be used if you have specified the option -A.


    sha-224, sha224
            algorithm:
                SHA-224

            length:
                224 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2004

            broken:
                no, but legacy (not recommended anymore by the BSI)

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 180-2

            comment:
                the Secure Hash Algorithm, as defined 2004 in the National
                Institute for Standards and Technology's Federal Information
                Processing Standard (NIST FIPS 180-2) and in RFC 3874.
                SHA-224 is based on SHA-256, but it uses a different initial
                value and the final hash is truncated to 224 bits.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use -C tagged or -F "SHA224 (#FILENAME) = #DIGEST" to get the
                "cksum -a sha224" output format from the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/sha224sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 224
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          /bin/sha224sum
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 12+:     /sbin/sha224
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/sha224sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 224
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha224
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/sha224sum
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 224
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha224
                - gpg:             gpg --print-md sha224
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/sha224sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 224
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -sha224
                - Mac OS X:        -
                - macOS 10.12+:    /usr/bin/shasum -a 224
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -sha224
                - PHP:             hash("sha224", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python 2.5+:     hashlib.sha224()
                - Solaris 10+:     -
                - Solaris 11.2+:   /usr/bin/sha224sum
                - Solaris 11 Express: -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Sha224 (by jonelo)


    sha-256, sha256
            algorithm:
                SHA-256

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2001

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 180-2

            comment:
                the Secure Hash Algorithm, as defined 2001 in the National
                Institute for Standards and Technology's Federal Information
                Processing Standard (NIST FIPS 180-2). SHA-256 can be optionally
                used by the file system called ZFS.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use -C solaris-tagged or -C solaris-untagged to print the
                Solaris digest style variants.
                Use -C openssl to print the openssl style.
                Use -C tagged to print the "cksum -a sha256" style from
                the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              7z h -scrcsha256
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/sha256sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 256
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sha256sum
                - CentOS:          /bin/sha256sum
                - DragonFly BSD:   /sbin/sha256
                - FreeBSD 6+:      /sbin/sha256
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/sha256sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 256
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha256
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/sha256sum
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 256
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha256
                - gpg:             gpg --print-md sha256
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-256");
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/sha256sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 256
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -sha256
                - Mac OS X:        -
                - macOS 10.12+:    /usr/bin/shasum -a 256
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/sum -a sha256
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha256
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/sum -a sha256
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha256
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -sha256
                - PHP:             hash("sha256", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      Get-FileHash -Algorithm SHA256
                - Python 2.5+:     hashlib.sha256()
                - Solaris 10+:     /usr/bin/digest -a sha256
                - Solaris 11.2+:   /usr/bin/sha256sum
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=sha256
                - Windows 7+:      certutil -hashfile <file> SHA256

            since:
                Jacksum 1.3.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest as provided by the JRE.
                gnu.crypto.hash.Sha256 is an alternate implementation and it is
                used if you have specified option -A.


    sha-384, sha384
            algorithm:
                SHA-384

            length:
                384 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function
            published:
                2001

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 180-2

            comment:
                the Secure Hash Algorithm, as defined 2001 in the National
                Institute for Standards and Technology's Federal Information
                Processing Standard (NIST FIPS 180-2).
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use -C solaris-tagged or -C solaris-untagged to print the
                Solaris digest style variants.
                Use -C openssl to print the openssl style.
                Use -C tagged to print the "cksum -a sha384" style from
                the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/sha384sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 384
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          /bin/sha384sum
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11+:     /sbin/sha384 (prob. earlier)
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/sha384sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 384
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha384
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/sha384sum
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 384
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha384
                - gpg:             gpg --print-md sha384
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-384");
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/sha384sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 384
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -sha384
                - Mac OS X:        -
                - macOS 10.12+:    /usr/bin/shasum -a 384
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/sum -a sha384
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha384
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/sum -a sha384
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha384
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -sha384
                - PHP:             hash("sha384", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      Get-FileHash -Algorithm SHA384
                - Python 2.5+:     hashlib.sha384()
                - Solaris 10+:     /usr/bin/digest -a sha384
                - Solaris 11.2+:   /usr/bin/sha384sum
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=sha384
                - Windows 7+:      certutil -hashfile <file> SHA384

            since:
                Jacksum 1.3.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest as provided by the JRE.
                gnu.crypto.hash.Sha384 is an alternate implementation and it is
                used if you have specified option -A.


    sha-512, sha512
            algorithm:
                SHA-512

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2001

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 180-2

            comment:
                the Secure Hash Algorithm, as defined 2001 in the National
                Institute for Standards and Technology's Federal Information
                Processing Standard (NIST FIPS 180-2).
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.
                Use -C solaris-tagged or -C solaris-untagged to print the
                Solaris digest style variants.
                Use -C openssl to print the openssl style.
                Use -C tagged to print the "cksum -a sha512" style from
                the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/sha512sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 512
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sha512sum
                - CentOS:          /bin/sha512sum
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11+:     /sbin/sha512  (probably also earlier)
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/sha512sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 512
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha512
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/sha512sum
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 512
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha512
                - gpg:             gpg --print-md sha512
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA-512");
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/sha512sum
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 512
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -sha512
                - Mac OS X:        -
                - macOS 10.12+:    /usr/bin/shasum -a 512
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/sum -a sha512
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha512
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD 9.2+:     /usr/bin/sum -a sha512
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sha512
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -sha512
                - PHP:             hash("sha512", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      Get-FileHash -Algorithm SHA512
                - Python 2.5+:     hashlib.sha512()
                - Solaris 10+:     /usr/bin/digest -a sha512
                - Solaris 11.2+:   /usr/bin/sha512sum
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=sha512
                - Windows 7+:      certutil -hashfile <file> SHA512

            since:
                Jacksum 1.3.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest as provided by the JRE.
                gnu.crypto.hash.Sha512 is an alternate implementation and it is
                used if you have specified option -A.


    sha-512/224, sha512/224, sha512t224
            algorithm:
                SHA-512/224

            length:
                224 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                03/2012

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 180-4

            comment:
                In March 2012, the secure hash standard was updated in
                FIPS PUB 180-4, adding the hash function SHA-512/224.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 512224
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/shasum -a 512224
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java 9+:         java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA512/224");
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - Mac OS X:        -
                - macOS 10.12+:    /usr/bin/shasum -a 512224
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  openssl dgst -sha512-224
                - PHP 7.1+:        hash("sha512/224", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris 11.4+:   /usr/bin/digest -a 512_t -t 224
                - Ubuntu:          /usr/bin/shasum -a 512224
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0
            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crytpo.digests.SHA512tDigest


    sha-512/256, sha512/256, sha512t256
            algorithm:
                SHA-512/256

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                03/2012

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 180-4

            comment:
                In March 2012, the secure hash standard was updated in
                FIPS 180-4, adding the hash function SHA-512/256.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/shasum -a 512256
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD 10.4+:   /sbin/sha512t256
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/shasum -a 512256
                                   (not available on every Linux)
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java 9+:         java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA512/256");
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - Mac OS X:        -
                - macOS 10.12+:    /usr/bin/shasum -a 512256
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  openssl dgst -sha512-256
                - PHP 7.1+:        hash("sha512/256", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris 11.4+:   /usr/bin/digest -a 512_t -t 256
                - Ubuntu:          /usr/bin/shasum -a 512256
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crytpo.digests.SHA512tDigest


    sha3-224, sha-3-224
            algorithm:
                SHA-3

            length:
                224 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                08/2015

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 202 (SHA-3 Standard)

            comment:
                In 2007 NIST announced the competition called
                "SHA-3 Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition" to determine
                SHA-3. In 2012, the Keccak team's submission was announced as
                the winner. However, in 2014 NIST made slight changes to the
                Keccak proposal, and published FIPS 202. FIPS specifies
                the new SHA-3 family of permutation-based hash functions that
                were published as a stardard on August 5, 2015. Note that only
                the four fixed-length SHA-3 algorithms are NIST approved
                hash algorithms: SHA3-224, SHA3-256, SHA3-384, and SHA3-512.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sha3sum [-a 224]
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java 9+:         java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA3-224");
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum --sha3-224
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  openssl dgst -sha3-224
                - PHP 7.1+:        hash("sha3-224", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python 3.6+:     hashlib.sha3_224()
                - Solaris 11.4+:   /usr/bin/digest -a sha3_224
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest, the alternate implementation
                org.bouncycastle.crytpo.digests.SHA3Digest will be used if your
                JRE/JDK doesn't support that algorithm, or if the option -A has
                been specified.


    sha3-256, sha-3-256
            algorithm:
                SHA-3

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                08/2015

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 202 (SHA-3 Standard)

            comment:
                In 2007 NIST announced the competition called
                "SHA-3 Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition" to determine
                SHA-3. In 2012, the Keccak team's submission was announced as
                the winner. However, in 2014 NIST made slight changes to the
                Keccak proposal, and published FIPS 202. FIPS specifies
                the new SHA-3 family of permutation-based hash functions that
                were published as a standard on August 5, 2015. Note that only
                the four fixed-length SHA-3 algorithms are NIST approved hash
                algorithms: SHA3-224, SHA3-256, SHA3-384, and SHA3-512.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sha3sum -a 256
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java 9+:         java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA3-256");
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum --sha3-256
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  openssl dgst -sha3-256
                - PHP 7.1+:        hash("sha3-256", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python 3.6+:     hashlib.sha3_256()
                - Solaris 11.4+:   /usr/bin/digest -a sha3_256
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest, the alternate implementation
                org.bouncycastle.crytpo.digests.SHA3Digest will be used if your
                JRE/JDK doesn't support that algorithm, or if the option -A has
                been specified.


    sha3-384, sha-3-384
            algorithm:
                SHA-3

            length:
                384 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                08/2015

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 202 (SHA-3 Standard)

            comment:
                In 2007 NIST announced the competition called
                "SHA-3 Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition"
                to determine SHA-3. In 2012, the Keccak team's submission was
                announced as the winner. However, in 2014 NIST made slight
                changes to the Keccak proposal, and published FIPS 202. FIPS
                specifies the new SHA-3 family of permutation-based hash
                functions that were published as a standard on August 5, 2015.
                Note that only the four fixed-length SHA-3 algorithms are NIST
                approved hash algorithms: SHA3-224, SHA3-256, SHA3-384,
                and SHA3-512.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sha3sum -a 384
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java 9+:         java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA3-384");
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum --sha3-384
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  openssl dgst -sha3-384
                - PHP 7.1+:        hash("sha3-384", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python 3.6+:     hashlib.sha3_384()
                - Solaris 11.4+:   /usr/bin/digest -a sha3_384
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest, the alternate implementation
                org.bouncycastle.crytpo.digests.SHA3Digest will be used if your
                JRE/JDK doesn't support that algorithm, or if the option -A has
                been specified.


    sha3-512, sha-3-512
            algorithm:
                SHA-3

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                08/2015

            broken:
                no

            standard:
                NIST FIPS 202 (SHA-3 Standard)

            comment:
                In 2007 NIST announced the competition called
                "SHA-3 Cryptographic Hash Algorithm Competition" to determine
                SHA-3. In 2012, the Keccak team's submission was announced as
                the winner. However, in 2014 NIST made slight changes to the
                Keccak proposal, and published FIPS 202. FIPS specifies
                the new SHA-3 family of permutation-based hash functions that
                were published as a standard on August 5, 2015. Note that only
                the four fixed-length SHA-3 algorithms are NIST approved
                hash algorithms: SHA3-224, SHA3-256, SHA3-384, and SHA3-512.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sha3sum -a 512
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java 9+:         java.security.MessageDigest.
                                   MessageDigest.getInstance("SHA3-512");
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum --sha3-512
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+:  openssl dgst -sha3-512
                - PHP 7.1+:        hash("sha3-512", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python 3.6+:     hashlib.sha3_512()
                - Solaris 11.4+:   /usr/bin/digest -a sha3_512
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                java.security.MessageDigest, the alternate implementation
                org.bouncycastle.crytpo.digests.SHA3Digest will be used if your
                JRE/JDK doesn't support that algorithm, or if the option -A has
                been specified.


    shake128
            algorithm:
                SHAKE128 (Secure Hash Algorithm KECCAK, 128 bit security)

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                XOF as a cryptographic hash function with a fixed output length

            published:
                08/2015

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://csrc.nist.gov/publications/detail/fips/202/final

            standard:
                NIST FIPS PUB 202 (SHA-3 Standard)

            comment:
                FIPS 202 from NIST specifies the new SHA-3 family of
                permutation-based hash functions, which were published as a
                standard on August 5, 2015.
                In addition to the four fixed-length hash functions, FIPS 202
                also defines two "eXtendable Output Functions (XOF)",
                SHAKE128 and SHAKE256.
                An XOF is a powerful new kind of cryptographic primitive that
                offers the flexibility to produce outputs with any desired
                length.
                The suffixes "128" and "256" indicate the security strengths
                that these two XOFs can generally support, in contrast to the
                suffixes for the fixed-length-hash functions, which indicate
                the digest lengths.
                The XOF can be specialized to a hash function by selecting a
                fixed output length.
                The SHAKE128 function have a generic security strength of 128
                bits against all attacks, provided that at least 2x128 bits
                of the output is used.
                Requesting more than 256 bits of output does not increase the
                collision-resistance of the SHAKE128 function.
                Jacksum takes those considerations into account and restricts
                the set of the supported value for the output length to
                256 bits in order to define a reasonable hash function.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD 10.4+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java 9+:         -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum [--shake128] --hex --outputbits 256
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+ (128 bits only): openssl dgst -shake128
                - PHP 7.1+:        -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.SHAKEDigest


    shake256
            algorithm:
                SHAKE256 (Secure Hash Algorithm KECCAK, 256 bit security)

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                XOF as a cryptographic hash function with a fixed output length

            published:
                08/2015

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://csrc.nist.gov/publications/detail/fips/202/final

            standard:
                NIST FIPS PUB 202 (SHA-3 Standard)

            comment:
                FIPS 202 from NIST specifies the new SHA-3 family of
                permutation-based hash functions, which were published as a
                standard on August 5, 2015.
                In addition to the four fixed-length hash functions, FIPS 202
                also defines two "eXtendable Output Functions (XOF)",
                SHAKE128 and SHAKE256.
                An XOF is a powerful new kind of cryptographic primitive that
                offers the flexibility to produce outputs with any desired
                length.
                The suffixes "128" and "256" indicate the security strengths
                that these two XOFs can generally support, in contrast to the
                suffixes for the fixed-length-hash functions, which indicate
                the digest lengths.
                The XOF can be specialized to a hash function by selecting a
                fixed output length.
                The SHAKE256 function have a generic security strength of 256
                bits against all attacks, provided that at least 2x256 bits
                of the output is used.
                Requesting more than 512 bits of output does not increase the
                collision-resistance of the SHAKE256 function.
                Jacksum takes those considerations into account and restricts
                the set of the supported value for the output length to
                512 bits in order to define a reasonable hash function.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD 10.4+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - KeccakSum:       KeccakSum --shake256 --hex --outputbits 512
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL 1.1.1+ (256 bits):  openssl dgst -shake256
                - PHP 7.1+:        -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Ubuntu:          -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.SHAKEDigest


    skein-256, skein-256-<length>, skein256
            algorithm:
                Skein-256

            length:
                customizable (<length> > 0 and <length> % 8 = 0),
                <length> = 256 bits if <length> is not specified

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                10/2010

            broken:
                no

            website:
                http://www.skein-hash.info/
                https://www.schneier.com/academic/skein/
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skein_(hash_function)

            comment:
                Skein is a cryptographic hash function and one of the five
                finalists in the NIST hash function competition.
                The name Skein refers to how the Skein function intertwines the
                input, similar to a skein of yarn. Skein was created by
                Bruce Schneier, Niels Ferguson, Stefan Lucks, Doug Whiting,
                Mihir Bellare, Tadayoshi Kohno, Jon Callas and Jesse Walker.
                Skein supports internal state sizes of 256, 512 and 1024 bits,
                and arbitrary output sizes.
                This is the implementation of version 1.3 of Skein, which was
                presented to NIST for the 3rd and final round of the competition
                in October 2010.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11.1+:   /sbin/skein256
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.SkeinDigest


    skein-512, skein-512-<length>, skein512
            algorithm:
                Skein-512

            length:
                customizable (w > 0 and <length> % 8 = 0),
                <length> = 512 bits if <length> is not specified

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                10/2010

            broken:
                no

            website:
                http://www.skein-hash.info/
                https://www.schneier.com/academic/skein/
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skein_(hash_function)

            comment:
                Skein is a cryptographic hash function and one of the five
                finalists in the NIST hash function competition.
                The name Skein refers to how the Skein function intertwines the
                input, similar to a skein of yarn. Skein was created by
                Bruce Schneier, Niels Ferguson, Stefan Lucks, Doug Whiting,
                Mihir Bellare, Tadayoshi Kohno, Jon Callas and Jesse Walker.
                Skein supports internal state sizes of 256, 512 and 1024 bits,
                and arbitrary output sizes.
                This is the implementation of version 1.3 of Skein, which was
                presented to NIST for the 3rd and final round of the competition
                in October 2010.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11.1+:   /sbin/skein512
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.SkeinDigest


    skein-1024, skein-1024-<length>, skein1024
            algorithm:
                Skein-1024

            length:
                customizable (w > 0 and <length> % 8 = 0),
                <length> = 1024 bits if <length> is not specified

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                10/2010

            broken:
                no

            website:
                http://www.skein-hash.info/
                https://www.schneier.com/academic/skein/
                https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Skein_(hash_function)

            comment:
                Skein is a cryptographic hash function and one of the five
                finalists in the NIST hash function competition.
                The name Skein refers to how the Skein function intertwines the
                input, similar to a skein of yarn. Skein was created by
                Bruce Schneier, Niels Ferguson, Stefan Lucks, Doug Whiting,
                Mihir Bellare, Tadayoshi Kohno, Jon Callas and Jesse Walker.
                Skein supports internal state sizes of 256, 512 and 1024 bits,
                and arbitrary output sizes.
                This is the implementation of version 1.3 of Skein, which was
                presented to NIST for the 3rd and final round of the competition
                in October 2010.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11.1+:   /sbin/skein1024
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.SkeinDigest


    streebog256, streebog-256
            algorithm:
                Streebog Hash Function (GOST R 34.11-2012)

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2012

            broken:
                attack demonstrated in theory (attack breaks all rounds and has
                lower complexity than security claim)
                see also https://eprint.iacr.org/2014/675

            website:
                https://www.streebog.net

            standards:
                GOST R 34.11-2012
                RFC 6986

            comment:
                Streebogis a cryptographic hash function defined in the Russian
                national standard GOST R 34.11-2012. It was co-developed by the
                FSB (Federalnaja Sluschba Besopasnosti), the Federal Security
                Service of the Russian Federation to replace the obsolete GOST
                hash function defined in the old standard GOST R 34.11-94, and
                as an asymmetric reply to SHA-3 competition by the US NIST.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11.1+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -strebog256
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.GOST3411_2012_256Digest


    streebog512, streebog-512
            algorithm:
                Streebog Hash Function (GOST R 34.11-2012)

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2012

            broken:
                no

            website:
                https://www.streebog.net

            standards:
                GOST R 34.11-2012
                RFC 6986

            comment:
                Streebogis a cryptographic hash function defined in the Russian
                national standard GOST R 34.11-2012. It was co-developed by the
                FSB (Federalnaja Sluschba Besopasnosti), the Federal Security
                Service of the Russian Federation to replace the obsolete GOST
                hash function defined in the old standard GOST R 34.11-94, and
                as an asymmetric reply to SHA-3 competition by the US NIST.´

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - BeOS:            -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11.1+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -strebog512
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0
            implementation:
                org.bouncycastle.crypto.digests.GOST3411_2012_512Digest


    sm3
            algorithm:
                SM3

            length:
                256 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                12/2010

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                SM3 is a cryptographic hash function used in the "Chinese
                National Standard". It was published by the State Cryptography
                Administration on December 17, 2010 as GM/T 0004-2012.

                Use -C linux-tagged or -F "SM3 (#FILENAME) = #DIGEST" to get the
                "cksum -a sm3" output format from the GNU Core Utilities 9.0.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 11.1+:   -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sm3
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sm3
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -sm3
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0


    sum<length>, sum-<length>
            algorithm:
                Sum

            length:
                8, 16, 24, 32, 40, 48, or 56 bits

            type:
                checksum

            comment:
                classic checksum, value is computed by adding together all
                values in the input data stream modulo 2^<length>.
                This algorithm doesn't care about the arrangement of bytes.
                The default encoding is decimal.
                sum8 is used by the Intel HEX file format for example.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.3.0; 40, 48, and 56 bits are available since
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.Sum*


    sum_bsd, bsd, bsdsum, sumbsd
            algorithm:
                BSD checksum algorithm

            length:
                16 bits

            type:
                checksum

            comment:
                output format is exactly like the native program sum (size in
                1024 byte blocks). The default encoding is decimal.
                See also sysv

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/sum [-r]
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            /bin/sum [-r]
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sum [-r]
                - CentOS:          -
                - eComStation:     C:\ecs\KLIBC\bin\sum [-r]
                - FreeBSD:         /usr/bin/sum
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -o 1
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/sum [-r]
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a bsd
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/sum [-r]
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a bsd
                - Haiku:           /bin/sum [-r]
                - HP-UX:           /usr/bin/sum -r
                - IBM AIX:         /usr/bin/sum [-r]
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/sum [-r]
                - macOS:           /usr/bin/sum
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -o 1
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/sum -o 1
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a old1
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -o 1
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a old1
                - NextStep:        /usr/bin/sum
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          /bin/sum -r
                - SCO UnixWare:    /bin/sum -r
                - Solaris -10:     /usr/ucb/sum
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum -r|--bsd|--method=<bsd|ucb>
                - Tcl:             crc::sum [-bsd]
                - Tru64 Unix:      /usr/bin/sum [-r]
                - Ultrix:          /usr/bin/sum
                - Windows:         -
                - OpenSSL:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.0.0, alias "bsdsum" since 1.2.0, alias "sumbsd"
                since 1.6.0, "sum_bsd" since 2.0.0)

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.SumBSD


    sum_minix
            algorithm:
                Minix' sum

            length:
                16 bits

            type:
                checksum

            comment:
                it is the same like the bsd algorithm, with the exception that
                the size is printed in 512 byte blocks rather than in 1024 byte
                blocks.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           /usr/bin/sum
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -
                - OpenSSL:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.SumBSD_Minix


    sum_plan9, crc32_fddi
            algorithm:
                FDDI CRC / Plan 9 sum

            length:
                32 bits

            type:
                CRC

            comment:
                The default encoding is decimal.
                The sum command on Plan 9 prints the crc in hex, in order to get
                the output of Plan 9, specify the option -E hex.
                The FDDI CRC cannot be described completely by the Rocksoft-
                Model, because the algorithm includes the xor'ed length to the
                CRC. Without this special, the code would be:
                crc:32,04C11DB7,0,true,true,0
                With the additional length parameter the algorithm can be
                expressed as
                crc:32,04C11DB7,0,true,true,0,true,CC55CC55

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - IBM AIX:         -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          /bin/sum
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum --method=fddi
                - Windows:         -
                - OpenSSL:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                crc:32,04C11DB7,0,true,true,0,true,CC55CC55


    sum_sysv, sysv, sysvsum, sumsysv
            algorithm:
               UNIX System V checksum algorithm

            length:
                16 bits

            type:
                checksum

            published:
                1985

            comment:
                output format is exactly like the native program sum
                (size in 512 bytes blocks), see also bsd.
                The default encoding is decimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Azure Cloud Shell (Common Base Linux 10):
                                   /usr/bin/sum -s|--sysv
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            /bin/sum -s
                - BusyBox:         /bin/sum -s
                - CentOS:          -
                - eComStation:     C:\ecs\KLIBC\bin\sum -s|--sysv
                - FreeBSD:         /usr/bin/cksum -o 2
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        /usr/bin/sum -s
                - GNU/Hurd (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sysv
                - GNU/Linux:       /usr/bin/sum -s
                - GNU/Linux (with GNU Core Utilities 9.0):
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a sysv
                - Haiku:           /bin/sum -s
                - HP-UX:           /usr/bin/sum
                - Kali Linux:      /usr/bin/sum -s
                - macOS:           /usr/bin/cksum -o 2
                - Minix 3.2.1+:    /usr/bin/sum -a old2
                                   /usr/bin/sum -o 2
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a old2
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -o 2
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          /usr/bin/cksum -o 2
                                   /usr/bin/sum -o 2
                                   /usr/bin/cksum -a old2
                                   /usr/bin/sum -a old2
                - NextStep:        -
                - PHP:             -
                - Plan 9:          /bin/sum -5
                - SCO UnixWare:    /bin/sum
                - Solaris -10:     /usr/bin/sum
                - Solaris 11 Express:
                                   /usr/bin/sum -s|--sysv|
                                   --method=<att|sys5|s5|default>
                - Tcl:             crc::sum -sysv
                - Tru64 Unix:      /usr/bin/sum -o
                - Windows:         -
                - OpenSSL:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.2.0, alias "sumsysv" since 1.6.0,
                alias "sum_sysv" since 2.0.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.SumSysV


    tiger128, tiger-128
            algorithm:
                Tiger 128

            length:
                128 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1995

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                the hash value is the first 128 bits of the result of Tiger-192.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD 5.3+:    -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("tiger128,3", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Tiger160 (by jonelo)


    tiger160, tiger-160
            algorithm:
                Tiger 160

            length:
                160 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1995

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                the hash value is the first 160 bits of the result of Tiger-192.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("tiger160,3", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Tiger160 (by jonelo)


    tiger, tiger192, tiger-192
            algorithm:
                Tiger

            length:
                192 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                1995

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                developed by Ross Anderson and Eli Biham, 1995.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - CentOS:          -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         -
                - PHP:             hash("tiger192,3", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                Jacksum 1.4.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Tiger


    tiger2
            algorithm:
                Tiger2

            length:
                192 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2005

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                developed by Ross Anderson and Eli Biham, 2005.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Tiger2 (by jonelo)


    tth, tree:tiger, tree:tiger192, tree:tiger-192
            algorithm:
                Tiger Tree Hash (based on a Hash tree/Merkle tree)

            length:
                192 bits

            published:
                Merkle tree was published in 1979, tiger was published in 1995.

            type:
                hash tree

            comment:
                tiger is the underlying algorithm for the hash tree.
                The hash tree was invented by Ralph Merkle, 1979. A hash tree is
                a tree of hashes in which the leaves are hashes of data blocks.
                The Tiger Tree Hash uses a binary hash tree (two child nodes
                under each node), with a data block size of 1024 bytes.
                Tiger Tree Hashes are used in P2P file sharing protocols and
                in file sharing applications.
                The default encoding is base32_nopad.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.7.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.wrappers.MDTigerTree


    tth2, tree:tiger2
            algorithm:
                Tiger Tree Hash 2 (based on a Hash tree/Merkle tree)

            length:
                192 bits

            published:
                Merkle tree was published in 1979, tiger2 was published in 2005.

            type:
                hash tree

            comment:
                tiger2 is the underlying algorithm for the hash tree.
                The hash tree was invented by Ralph Merkle, 1979. A hash tree is
                a tree of hashes in which the leaves are hashes of data blocks.
                The Tiger Tree Hash uses a binary hash tree (two child nodes
                under each node), with a data block size of 1024 bytes.
                Tree hashes are used in P2P file sharing protocols and
                applications.
                The default encoding is base32_nopad.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.7.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.wrappers.MDTigerTree


    vsh, vsh-1024
            algorithm:
                VSH (Very Smooth Hash)

            length:
                1024 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                11/2005

            broken:
                no

            website:
                http://www.nist.gov/hash-function (archived)
                http://www.csrc.nist.gov/pki/HashWorkshop/2005/Nov1_Presentations/LENSTRA_vsh.pdf (archived)

            comment:
                In response to the SHA-1 vulnerability that was announced in
                Feb. 2005, NIST held a Cryptographic Hash Workshop on
                Oct. 31-Nov. 1, 2005 to solicit public input on its
                cryptographic hash function policy and standards.
                VSH was presented on Nov 1, 2005 by scientists from the
                Macquarie University, Sydney and Bell Laboratories (Lucent
                Technologies) at this first NIST Hash Workshop.
                The NIST conducted also a second workshop.
                However, NIST did not select an algorithm immediately, but held
                a public competition from 2007 to 2012 (SHA-3 Competition) to
                find a successor for SHA-1 and the SHA-2 family.

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                de.flexiprovider.core.md.VSH


    whirlpool0, whirlpool-0
            algorithm:
                Whirlpool-0

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2000

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                The Whirlpool Hashing Function by Paulo S.L.M. Barreto and
                Vincent Rijmen, 2000. This is the original specification of
                Whirlpool from 2000.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Whirlpool (by jonelo)


    whirlpool1, whirlpool-1, whirlpool-t
            algorithm:
                Whirlpool-1

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2001

            broken:
                yes

            comment:
                The Whirlpool Hashing Function by Paulo S.L.M. Barreto and
                Vincent Rijmen, 2001. This is the first revision of the
                specification of Whirlpool from 2001 with improved S-box design:
                "We propose renaming the original algorithm Whirlpool-0 and
                using the term Whirlpool for the final, modified version that
                uses the improved S-box design."
                Since March 2007 the Whirlpool authors name this whirlpool
                revision "Whirlpool-T".
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.2.0

            implementation:
                gnu.crypto.hash.Whirlpool


    whirlpool, whirlpool2, whirlpool-2
            algorithm:
                Whirlpool

            length:
                512 bits

            type:
                cryptographic hash function

            published:
                2003

            broken:
                no

            comment:
                The Whirlpool Hashing Function by Paulo S.L.M. Barreto and
                Vincent Rijmen. This is the second revision of the specification
                of Whirlpool from 2003 with improved diffusion matrix:
                "Recently [March 11, 2003], Shirai and Shibutani discovered a
                flaw in the Whirlpool diffusion matrix that made its branch
                number suboptimal. Although this flaw per se does not seem to
                introduce an effective vulnerability, the present document
                replaces that matrix [May 24, 2003]"
                This whirlpool revision was adopted by the International
                Organization for Standardization (ISO) in the
                ISO/IEC 10118-3:2004 standard.
                The default encoding is hexadecimal.

            compatibility:
                - 7z:              -
                - Angstrom:        -
                - BeOS:            -
                - BusyBox:         -
                - DragonFly BSD:   -
                - FreeBSD:         -
                - FreeDOS:         -
                - GNU/Hurd:        -
                - GNU/Linux:       -
                - gpg:             -
                - HP-UX:           -
                - Java:            -
                - Kali Linux:      -
                - LibreSSL:        openssl dgst -whirlpool
                - macOS:           -
                - Minix:           -
                - MS-DOS:          -
                - NetBSD:          -
                - NextStep:        -
                - OpenSSL:         openssl dgst -whirlpool
                - PHP:             hash("whirlpool", $input);
                - Plan 9:          -
                - PowerShell:      -
                - Python:          -
                - Solaris:         -
                - Windows:         -

            since:
                 Jacksum 1.6.0

            implementation:
                 gnu.crypto.hash.Whirlpool (by jonelo)


    xor8, xor-8
            algorithm:
                Exclusive-OR

            length:
                8 bits

            type:
                checksum

            comment:
                value computed by xoring all values in the input data stream.
                This algorithm doesn't care about the arrangement of bytes in a
                file. The default encoding is decimal.

            since:
                Jacksum 1.3.0

            implementation:
                net.jacksum.algorithms.checksums.Xor8


    xxhash32, xxh32
            algorithm:
                xxHash32 (XXH32)

            length:
                32 Bits

            type:
                non-cryptographic hash function

            website:
                http://www.xxhash.com/

            comment:
                The default output is equivalent to the Open Source program
                called xxhsum: hex lowercase checksum, big endian,
                without message length.

            compatibility:
                - xxhsum:          xxhsum -H0
                                   xxhsum -H32

            since:
                Jacksum 3.0.0

            implementation:
                org.apache.commons.codec.digest.XXHash32

OUTPUT FORMAT

    The output format of Jacksum:

            If you specify neither a predefined format (option -C/--style) nor a
            customized format (option -F), the following default format is used.
            Actually it is a very flexible format which is based on the BSD
            reversed mode format (it doesn't use a character to distinguish
            binary and text mode), but it allows you to include optionally file
            size, and time stamp, and to flag/enable filename escaping as
            suggested by the GNU coreutils.

            [escchar]checksum<sep>[filesize<sep>][timestamp<sep>]<filename>

            escchar   optional. The escape character can only be a backslash.
                      The existance of the backslash represents whether file
                      name escaping is required or not for the line. You can
                      enable GNU escaping by setting the option
                      --gnu-filename-escaping.

            checksum  is a checksum, CRC or a hash value; by default the
                      encoding/representation of the hash value depends on the
                      option -a, but you can specify the encoding explicitly
                      by setting -E, -g, -G, -x, and -X.

            <sep>     is the separator string; it can be modified by -s,
                      otherwise it depends on the -a setting.

            filesize  optional. It is the size (in bytes or blocks) of a file,
                      the actual representation for the size depends on the -a
                      setting, often it is a normal decimal representation.
                      The filesize won't be written by any crytographic hash
                      function, but it can be forced by setting the option
                      called --filesize.

            timestamp optional. It is the timestamp of a file; timestamps
                      can be requested and configured with option -t.

            filename  is the name of a file. Paths can be omitted by option
                      --no-path, made absolute by option --path-absolute, and
                      made relative to another path by setting the option called
                      --path-relative-to. Furthermore the path separator can be
                      specified by -P, and problematic characters in file names
                      can be escaped by setting --gnu-filename-escaping.


EXIT STATUS

    0  - everything is OK
    1  - there was at least one mismatch during the verification process
    >1 - in case of a parameter-, .jacksum- or I/O-error

EXAMPLES

    Get information about one algorithm:

        `jacksum --help md5`
        prints the MD5 section from the help file, including a compatibility
        list.

        `jacksum -a md5 --info`
        prints implementation details about the MD5 algorithm, such as hash
        length in bits

        `jacksum -a crc64_xz --info`
        prints implementation details about the CRC64_xz. Since it is a CRC,
        also the CRC parameters such as the polynomial is printed.


    Get information about multiple algorithms:

        `jacksum -a all --list`
        prints a list of all supported algorithm IDs.

        `jacksum -a all --list --verbose summary`
        prints a list of all supported algorithm IDs and the count of the
        algorithms.

        `jacksum -a all:skein --list`
        prints a list of all supported algorithm IDs that has skein in their
        names.

        `jacksum -a all:128 --list`
        prints a list of all supported algorithm IDs that produce a digest
        length of 128 bits.

        `jacksum -a all:8 --list --info`
        prints a list of all supported algorithms IDs that produce a digest
        length of 8 bits, and for each algorithm ID additional information is
        printed.


    Get information on compatibility definitions:

        `jacksum -C bsd --info`
        all properties of the compatibility definition for bsd are printed out.


    Calculate hashes from standard input (stdin):

        `echo -n "Hello World" | jacksum -V summary -`
        Calculates a SHA3-256 hash (default) from standard input stream (stdin).
        Enabling the option `--verbose summary` or `-V summary` make sense in
        some cases, because it will show how many bytes have been read actually.
        Note: the echo command could behave on your platform/environment
        completely different!
        A more platform independent way is to use the -q option.

        `printf "Hello World\r\n" | jacksum -`
        Returns the SHA3-256 (default) of the input "Hello World\r\n".
        printf is a shell builtin in GNU/Linux shells such as bash and zsh.
        A more platform independent way is to use the -q option.

        `jacksum -a md5 -`
        Calculates the MD5 hash from input that is entered in the terminal.
        Hit Ctrl+Z on GNU/Linux and macOS, and Ctrl+D on Windows to end the
        input.

        `cat fat.iso | jacksum -`
        prints the SHA3-256 (default) of the binary file called fat.iso on
        GNU/Linux and macOS. Use type rather than cat on Microsoft Windows.


    Calculate hashes from the command line:

        `jacksum -q txt:"The quick brown fox jumps over the lazy dog"`
        calculates the sha3-256 (default) hash from the given string.

        `jacksum -a crc32 -q 'txt:Hello World!'`
        calculates a 32-bit CRC of the text "Hello World!". In GNU/Linux
        shells such as bash you have to enclose characters in single quotes
        rather than double quotes in order to preserve the literal value of each
        character within the quotes. On Windows you can use double quotes.

        `jacksum -q txtf:"Hallo Welt\r\n"`
        Returns the SHA3-256 (default) of the input "Hallo Welt\r\n",
        interpreted as UTF-8 String and using of escape sequences.

        `jacksum -a crc32 -q 48656C6C6F20576F726C6421`
        calculates a 32-bit CRC of the hex sequence
        48656C6C6F20576F726C6421 which actually represents the string
        "Hello World!" (without the quotes)

        `jacksum -a crc64 -q txt:`
        calculates a 64-bit CRC of an empty string (the result is the same
        if you calculate the 64-bit CRC of a file with a file size of 0 bytes)

        `jacksum -V summary -q txtf:abc\n -F "#ALGONAME(#SEQUENCE) = #HASH" -x`
        calculates the sha3-256 (default) of 4 input bytes. Since you have
        specified #SEQUENCE and -V summary, you can see not only the input as
        hex, but also the number of bytes that have been read.


    Calculate hashes from files on the file system:

        `jacksum -a crc32 -x *.txt`
        calculates a 32 bit CRC of all text files within the current folder.
        The checksum will be printed in a hexadecimal format (-x).

        `jacksum -a crc32 -t default .`
        not only CRCs will be printed, but also timestamps (-t) of all
        files within the current folder (.)

        `jacksum -a crc:16,1021,FFFF,false,false,0 .`
        a CRC with customized parameters has been used: 16 Bit, Polynomial 1021
        (hex, without the leading bit), initvalue FFFF (hex), mirror neither
        the input nor the output, no xor.

        `jacksum -a haval_256_5 .`
        calculates a 256 bit hash with 5 rounds by using the haval
        algorithm (haval_256_5) of all files within the current folder (.)

        `jacksum -a cksum /mnt/share`
        calculates a 32 bit CRC with the standard Unix-algorithm cksum
        of all files /mnt/share and it's sub folders

        `jacksum -A -a md5 -V summary bigfile.iso`
        Among others it also returns the elapsed time (-V summary) which was
        necessary to calculate the MD5 Hash of the file called bigfile.iso
        by using the alternate MD5 implementation (-A).


    Calculate hashes from file lists:

        `jacksum --file-list filelist.txt`
        for each filename in filelist.txt, read the file and calculate the
        hashes.

        `jacksum --file-list filelist.txt *.mp3 *.info myfolder`
        for each filename in filelist.txt, for all *.mp3 and *.info files, and
        for any files under myfolder, read the files and calculate the hashes.

        `chcp 65001 & echo "a filename that contains unicode chars" |
                jacksum --utf8 --file-list - --file-list-format ssv`
        on the Windows' cmd, change the code page to UTF-8, and pass a filename
        that contains unicode characters through a pipe to Jacksum
        (--file-list -). The file list format has been specified as ssv which
        stands for space separated values. --utf8 has been set in order to
        read the filenames from the pipe in UTF-8 mode.


    Create hash lists for later verification:

        `jacksum -o hashes.list /data`
        calculates the Message-Digest SHA3-256 (default) of all files in /data
        and it's subfolders, and stores the output to hashes.list, path
        information is stored absolutely since your path started with /.

        `jacksum -o hashes.list data`
        calculates the Message-Digest SHA3-256 (default) of all files in data
        and it's sub folders, and stores output to hashes.list, path
        information is stored relatively, because your path didn't start with /.

        `jacksum -a blake3+ -o hashes.list data`
        calculates the Message-Digest Blake3 of all files in data
        and it's sub folders, and stores output to hashes.list. Since the + has
        been used, filesizes are also stored to hashes.list.

        `jacksum -a blake3+ -E base64 -t iso8601 -o hashes.list data`
        calculates the Message-Digest Blake3 of all files in data
        and it's sub folders, and stores output to hashes.list. Hashes are
        stored in base64 format. Since the + has been used, filesizes are also
        stored to hashes.list, and since the -t iso8601 has been used,
        timestamps are also stored to hashes.list.

        `jacksum -a sm3 -E base64 -o hashes.txt -C linux *.txt`
        calculates the SM3 hashes in base64 encoding for all txt-files
        using the linux compatibility output format.


    Check/verify hashes:

        `jacksum -a sha256 -E hex -e
            5fdebc435ded46ae99136ca875afc6f05bde217be7dd018e1841924f71db46b5
            ubuntu-20.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso`
        checks the Ubuntu iso in the current working directory with an expected
        SHA256, hexadecimal message digest.

        `echo "5fdebc435ded46ae99136ca875afc6f05bde217be7dd018e1841924f71db46b5 *ubuntu-20.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso"
            | jacksum -a sha256 -C linux --check-file -`
        checks the SHA256 message digest for the Ubuntu iso on GNU/Linux

        `echo 5fdebc435ded46ae99136ca875afc6f05bde217be7dd018e1841924f71db46b5 *ubuntu-20.04.3-desktop-amd64.iso|
            jacksum -a sha256 -C linux --check-file -`
        checks the SHA256 message digest for the ubuntu iso on Microsoft Windows.
        Note that you have to remove the quotes and the blanks, otherwise
        the echo command will pass those characters to the pipe.

        `jacksum -a blake3+ -E base64 -t iso8601 -c hashes.list`
        verifies all checksums stored in a file called hashes.list. You have to
        specify -a blake3+ and -E hex, because Blake3 was the algorithm, and hex
        was the encoding that was used when the hashes.list was generated.

        `jacksum -a blake3+ -E base64 -t iso8601 -c hashes.list data`
        same as above, but the data folder will be searched for new files as well.

        `jacksum -C bsd -a sha3-256 -c bsd-hashes.list .`
        checks the integrity of the sha3-256 hashes for all filenames stored in
        the hashes.list, and it also finds all new files that are being stored
        anywhere in the directory tree below the current working directory.

        `jacksum -c my.hashes -a sha3-256 -E hex --list --list-filter bad
             --verbose nosummary`
        lists filenames for bad files (failed or missing) only.


    Customize the output:

        `jacksum -C bsd -a sha3-256 .`
        calculates the SHA3-256 hashes for all files in the current
        directory recursively in BSD-style format.

        `jacksum -a md5+sha1 -F "MD5-SHA1(#FILENAME)= #HASH{hex}" file`
        produces the same output as `openssl dgst -md5-sha1 file`

        `jacksum -a ed2k -F
            "ed2k://|file|#FILENAME{name}|#FILESIZE|#HASH{hex}|/" .`
        produces ed2k-links

        `jacksum -a tth+ed2k+sha1+md5 -F
            "magnet:?xl=#FILESIZE&dn=#FILENAME{name}
            &xt=urn:tree:tiger:#HASH{tth,base32}
            &xt=urn:ed2k:#HASH{ed2k,hex}
            &xt=urn:bitprint:#HASH{sha1,base32}.#HASH{tth,base32}
            &xt=urn:sha1:#HASH{sha1,base32}
            &xt=urn:md5:#HASH{md5,hex}" -`
        produces magnet-links

        `jacksum -a sumsysv -E dec -t unixtime -F
            "1 i #FILENAME{name} #FILESIZE #CHECKSUM #TIMESTAMP"
            install/*`
        prints appropriate entries that are compatible with the
        syntax of a Solaris 10+ pkgmap file - that is useful if you
        want to patch a Solaris patch for example.


    Find files having the same hash (find all duplicates of the file):

        `jacksum -a md5 -E hex -F #FILENAME -e 9666f5e2632d05b806e782d7d50855e8 .`
        finds all files below the current working directory, that produces
        the given hex-encoded MD5-hash. Only the filenames of those files
        will be printed.


    Find the algorithm that produces a particular hash:

        `jacksum -a unknown:16 -q hex:050000 -E hex -e d893`
        Finds all algorithms with a digest length of 16 bits that can produce
        the hex output d893 for the hex input 050000. The example above returns
        20 potential algorithms, each of those returns the same checksum. Test
        with more input/output sequences in order to find the right algorithm.


    Customize the output format:

        `jacksum -a sha256 -P / -F "<a href=\"#FILENAME\">#HASH</a><br>" mp4s`
        prints the SHA256 hashes for all files in the mp4s folder as hyperlinks
        with the slash as path separator, even on Windows where the path
        separator would be the back slash.

        `jacksum -a sumsysv -E dec -t unixtime
            -F "1 i #FILENAME{name} #FILESIZE #CHECKSUM #TIMESTAMP" install/*`
        prints appropriate entries that are compatible with the syntax of
        Solaris 10's pkgmap file (useful if you want to patch a Solaris patch)

        `jacksum -a sha1 -s "\t" -t "EEE, MMM d, yyyy 'at' h:mm a" .`
        calculates a 160 bit SHA-1 Message-Digest of all files within the
        current folder. The separator string (-s) is set to the tabulator
        char ("\t"). Timestamps of files will be printed out in a customized
        format (-t).

        `jacksum -a md5 -f -F "#FINGERPRINT #FILESIZE #FILENAME" *`
        calculates the Message-Digest MD5 of all files in the current
        directory. The output format is customized, it prints also
        the filesize.

        `jacksum -a crc32 -X -f -p -r -F "#FILENAME #CHECKSUM" -o list.sfv *`
        prints CRC-32 values in the Simple File Verificator (SFV) format

        `jacksum -a ed2k -f -F
        "ed2k://|file|#FILENAME|#FILESIZE|#FINGERPRINT|" *`
        calculates the edonkey hash of all files in the current directory
        with a customized output format

        `jacksum -a ed2k -f -P / -F "<a href=#QUOTEed2k://|file
        |#FILENAME|#FILESIZE|#FINGERPRINT|#QUOTE>#FILENAME</a>" .`
        calculates the edonkey hash of all files in the current directory
        and it's sub folders with a customized output format (HTML)

        `jacksum -a tree:tiger -F "urn:#ALGONAME:#FINGERPRINT" -q hex:`
        calculates the root hash of the Tiger Tree Hash (a widely used form of
        the Merkle tree). The underlying Tiger algorithm is used with an empty
        input.


    Working with multiple algorithms:
        `jacksum -a sha1+crc32 .`
        calculates the sha1 hash and the crc32 as a chained checksum

        `jacksum -a sha1+crc32 -F "sha1=#CHECKSUM{0} crc32=#CHECKSUM{1} #FILENAME" .`
        calculates the sha1 hash and the crc32, printed separately

        `jacksum -a all -F "#ALGONAME{i} (#FILENAME) = #CHECKSUM{i}" .`
        calculates all supported algorithms on all files in a customized format

        `jacksum -a all -q txt: -F "#ALGONAME{i}"`
        returns all supported algorithm IDs only, a more elegant way is to type
        `jacksum -a all --list` however

        `jacksum -a all:224 -q txt: -F "#ALGONAME{i}"`
        returns all supported algorithm IDs that have a bit-length of 224 only
        a more elegant way is to type `jacksum -a all:224 --list`however

        `jacksum -a crc32+md5+sha1 -F
        "#SEPARATOR#ALGONAME{i}(#FILENAME):hex=#DIGEST{i,hex}
         #SEPARATOR#ALGONAME{i}(#FILENAME):HEX=#DIGEST{i,hex-uppercase}
         #SEPARATOR#ALGONAME{i}(#FILENAME):base64=#DIGEST{i,base64}"
        -s "\n" -r .`
        for all files, including all subdirectories, calculate the crc32, md5
        and sha1 hash and for each of those algorithms print the digest encoded
        in hex, uppercase hex and base64

        `jacksum -a sha3-512+blake2b -q txtf:"Hello World\x0a" -s \n -F
        "#ALGONAME{0} (#SEQUENCE)[hex] = #DIGEST{0,hex}#SEPARATOR
         #ALGONAME{1} (#SEQUENCE)[bb] = #DIGEST{1,bb}"`
        Returns the SHA3-512 digest hexadecimal and the blake2b Digest in the
        BubbleBabble format for the input that has been specified with -q.

        `cat template.txt
        INPUT:
            hex:     #SEQUENCE{hex}
            base32:  #SEQUENCE{base32}
            base64:  #SEQUENCE{base64}
        OUTPUT of #ALGONAME{i}:
            hex:     #CHECKSUM{i,base16}
            base32:  #CHECKSUM{i,base32}
            base64:  #CHECKSUM{i,base64}`
        `jacksum -a blake2b+sha3-512 -q txtf:123456789\x0a -E hex -g 1 -F \
        "$(cat template.txt)"`
        with the help of a template that is stored in a plain text file, not
        only the input "123456789\x0a", but also the hashes are being encoded
        as hex, base32 and base64 for both algorithms blake2s and sha3-512.

        `jacksum -s \n -a sha1+sha1+sha3-256 -F
        "#ALGONAME{0}/hex: #CHECKSUM{0,hex} #FILENAME{name}#SEPARATOR
         #ALGONAME{1}/base32: #CHECKSUM{1,base32} #FILENAME{name}#SEPARATOR
         #ALGONAME{2}/base64: #CHECKSUM{2,base64} #FILENAME{name}#SEPARATOR"
        *.txt`
        You want different encodings, such as hex and base32 for SHA-1, and
        base64 for SHA3-256?
        Each text file will be read only once and also sha1's engine will run
        only once for each file.


    Get information about the program:

        `jacksum -v` or `jacksum --version`
        returns the version of Jacksum

        `jacksum -h` or `jacksum --help`
        prints the entire manpage

        `jacksum --info`
        returns the version of Jacksum, primary IDs of all supported algorithms
        and their descriptions, number of supported algorithms, supported
        character sets, number of supported character sets, system properties,
        available processors for the application and many more.
        Useful for support requests.


    Legal stuff:
        jacksum --license
            prints the entire license text.

        jacksum --copyright
            prints out the copyrights and license information for all portions
            of the software that Jacksum licensed.


    Working with the help: print entire sections
        jacksum -h license
            prints the entire LICENSE section

        jacksum -h synopsis
            prints the entire SYNOPSIS section

        jacksum -h exit
            prints the entire EXIT section

        jacksum -h examples
            prints the entire EXAMPLES section

        jacksum -h ex
            prints the sections exit and examples


    Working with the help: print information about algorithms

        jacksum -h whirlpool
            prints information about all algorithms that starting with whirlpool


    Working with the help: search for options
        jacksum -h -h
            prints the help on the -h option

        jacksum -h --path
            prints information about all available options starting with --path

        jacksum -h -
            prints all options (since each option starts with a minis sign)

        jacksum -h | more
            prints the entire help, pagewise (more should work on all OS)

AUTHOR

    Copyright (c) 2001-2006, 2021-2022, Dipl.-Inf. (FH) Johann N. Loefflmann
    <https://jacksum.net>

LICENSE

    This program is free software: you can redistribute it and/or modify
    it under the terms of the GNU General Public License as published by
    the Free Software Foundation; either version 3 of the License, or any
    later version.

    This program is distributed in the hope that it will be useful,
    but WITHOUT ANY WARRANTY; without even the implied warranty of
    MERCHANTABILITY or FITNESS FOR A PARTICULAR PURPOSE. See the
    GNU General Public License for more details.

    You should have received a copy of the GNU General Public License along
    with this program. If not, see <https://www.gnu.org/licenses/>.